Features

What’s in a name?

“Is writing seemly? Does the writer cut a respectable figure? Is it proper to write? Is it done?”

- Jacques Derrida, “Plato’s Pharmacy” in Disseminations

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“I choose… Estrella. Yes, you can call me Estrella when you write.”

“Are you sure?” I asked.

Estrella nodded her head, a wisp of dyed honey-blonde hair coming loose from …

In the Journals

Theorising Health Inequalities — A special issue of Social Theory & Health

sthThe current issue of Social Theory & Health is a special double issue on theorizing health inequalities. Comprising eleven articles, the issue developed out developed out of a 2012 symposium held at the University of Edinburgh, entitled “Where Next for Health Inequalities?” As guest editors Katherine E. Smith and Ted Schrecker write in their introduction (the full text of which …

In the Journals

Community Health Workers and Social Change: Global and Local Perspectives — A special issue of the Annals of Anthropological Practice

Annals of Anthro PracticecoverThe current issue of the Annals of Anthropological Practice is a special issue, entitled “Community Health Workers and Social Change: Global and Local Perspectives.” The issue comprises an introduction by Kenneth Maes and five articles, the abstracts of which are below. Enjoy!

Community health workers and social change: An introduction
Kenneth Maes

Major global health institutions, public and

Web Roundups

Web Roundup: Biohacking, BioArt, and other Playful Abominations

These days, it is fun to “hack” almost everything. You can hack your life, you can hack your home, and you can even hack your period. So, as the web continues to grow more material on synthetic biology, let us turn once again to the world of biohacking.

A particularly interesting piece considers the possibility of …

Features

“Bioculturalism” — An interview with Christopher Lynn

This article is part of the series:

This series aims to get anthropologists and closely-related others talking seriously, and thinking practically, about how to synergize biological and social scientific approaches to human health and well-being, and to what positive ends. In this interview, Christopher Lynn responds to questions posed by series organizer Jeffrey G. Snodgrass.

 

How and why might cultural anthropologists and social scientists interested

Features

Image as Method: Conversations on Anthropology through the Image

This article is part of the series:

What follows is a series of conversations conducted after the recent Image as Method symposium, which took place on May 4th and 5th, 2015, at Columbia Universitys Heyman Center for the Humanities, organized by Brian Goldstone. The symposium featured numerous presenters and commentators: Diana Allan, Vincent Crapanzano, Robert Desjarlais, Angela Garcia, Gökç