Books

Osagie Obasogie’s Blinded By Sight

Blinded By Sight: Seeing Race Through the Eyes of the Blind

by Osagie K. Obasogie

Stanford Law Books, Stanford University Press, 2014, 269 pp.

 

Osagie Obasogie’s Blinded by Sight is driven by a seemingly straightforward question: how do blind people understand race? To answer this, he divides his analysis into two parts. In the first half of the book, …

Features

Putting Science in its Place

In some corners of anthropology, it has been said that science studies lacks a robust sense of place. But many capable ethnographers have brought labs, hospital suites, and production facilities to life, giving readers a granular sense for what distinguishes these sites from other milieux. What, precisely, might be missing? Consider the word “place.” As science studies scholars have repeatedly …

Books

Stefan Ecks’ Eating Drugs

Eating Drugs: Psychopharmaceutical Pluralism in India

by Stefan Ecks

New York University Press, 2013. 233 pp.

 

In Stefan Ecks’ poignant ethnography, he illuminates the relationship between digestive health and mental health in Calcutta, paying particular attention to the contributions this relationship has made to a pharmaceuticalized India. He traces three medical systems––Ayurvedic, homeopathic and allopathic––as they each locate the …

In the Journals

In the Journals, April 2014 – Part I

Here is the first installment of April’s “In the Journals.”  Enjoy!

In the Journal of Aging Studies,

Permanent personhood or meaningful decline? Toward a critical anthropology of successful aging
Sarah Lamb

The current North American successful aging movement offers a particular normative model of how to age well, one tied to specific notions of individualist personhood especially valued in

Books

Top of the heap: Ken MacLeish

This article is part of the series:

In today’s “Top of the heap,” Ken MacLeish, Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Medicine, Health and Society at Vanderbilt University, takes us into the world of war (and post-war) memoir, fiction and ethnography, also introducing us to some conceptual texts he’s been thinking with.

Ken MacLeish

Danny Hoffman, The War Machines: Young Men and Violence in Sierra Leone and Liberia

Features

Bleach

My friend Dr. Muñoz makes his own bleach.  He uses salt, water, and electrodes to render sodium hypochlorite.  To do this, he has colonized a small space in a garage-cum-storage unit nestled on the grounds of the Managua health center where he works.  His bleach-making is ad-hoc and off the books.  Dr. Muñoz doesn’t get extra money or time from …