Features

Internet-Based Access to PrEP in the U.S.: A “Critically Applied” Approach and the Symbolic Effects of a Clinical-Technological Assemblage

This article is part of the series:

Introduction

“I‘d been trying to get PrEP through my physician at the time, and …I had to print up all these studies and all the prescription information because my doctor was like, ‘Well, you don’t have HIV.’ And I’m like, ‘I know. That’s the point. I don’t want to get it.’ And he’s like, ‘Well, [Truvada] is not for that.’

Books

Jennifer Reich’s Calling the Shots Why Parents Reject Vaccines

Calling the Shots: Why Parents Reject Vaccines

Jennifer Reich

NYU Press, 2016. 336 pages.

A timely intervention into recent anti-vaccination controversies, Jennifer Reich’s Calling the Shots unpacks the logics behind vaccine refusal through interviews and ethnographic studies of parents who refuse vaccinations. Eschewing the reductive stereotyping and dismissive condescension that vaccination proponents like Paul Offit have tended take, Reich adopts …

Web Roundups

Web Roundup: Beyond Using More Female Rats: Gender Disparities in Biomedicine

Recently, physicians, public health experts, and anthropologists (among others) have pointed to a prevalence of gender, class, race, age, and ethnic bias in biomedical research and the specific ways in which knowledges about bodies are created and reproduced in biomedicine.

In the 19th century, when the long-standing idea of women’s inferiority was brought into question more …

In the Journals

In the Journals, June 2019

Here are a selection of articles from June. The topics include issues of translation in social studies of medicine, access to health care, and many others.

American Anthropologist

Whose Global, Which Health? Unsettling Collaboration With Careful Equivocation (open access)

Emily Yates-Doerr

The recent push for multidisciplinary collaboration confronts anthropologists with a long‐standing ethnographic problem. The terms we have to

Lectures

Life/NonLife: a forum

This Somatosphere forum features essays written in the wake of a debate held at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the Association of Social Anthropologists of the United Kingdom and the Commonwealth. The debate was organized around the following motion: “Lacking empirical traction and heuristic power, the distinction between life and nonlife is one that anthropology needs to discard.” We hope …

Lectures

Suffering, Agency, and the Value of Early and Late Life

‘Do no harm’ is the first principle in both research ethics and bioethics, conveying an inherent ambiguity in the biomedical imperative to create healthier and longer human lives. As such, both medical intervention and research have always straddled the delicate border between care and violence, exposing how doing good can be easily transformed into or confused with doing harm. This …