Books

Joseph Dumit’s Drugs for Life

Drugs for Life: How Pharmaceutical Companies Define Our Health

by Joseph Dumit

Duke University Press, 2012. pp. 280.

Since the 1970s, scholarly work on pharmaceuticals has long engaged a number of concerns, debates and controversies: the socialities and politics of consumption, the commercialization of the life sciences, and restricted access to life-saving medicines as a result of global patent and …

In the Journals

In the Journals, September 2014 – Part II

As a follow-up to Anna’s post, here are additional September articles of interest.

Anthropology and Medicine 
Special Issue: Mediating Medical Technologies: Flows, Frictions and New Socialities

Medical technologies: flows, frictions and new socialities
Anita Hardon & Eileen Moyer

While social scientists often highlight the way medical technologies mediate biomedical hegemony, this special issue focuses on the creative and often

Features

An Emerging Infectious Disease Perspective, Inter Alia

This article is part of the series:

As the saying goes, ‘there are no good models, only useful ones’. Tell a disease modeler that, and they might shake their head, interrupting to correct you – “only elegant ones”. And Hufnagel et al’s (2004) influential disease simulation, now ten years old, is quite elegant indeed. Published following the emergence and spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in

Books

Top of the heap: Sarah Willen

This article is part of the series:


For this installment of “Top of the heap,” we spoke to Sarah Willen, Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Director of the Human Rights Institute’s Research Program on Global Health and Human Rights at the University of Connecticut.

Sarah Willen

This summer I found myself puzzling deeply over the notion of dignity. In fields like political philosophy, bioethics, law, …

Features

Race and the immuno-logics of Ebola response in West Africa

This article is part of the series:

On September 14, 2014, I woke up to the news that a fourth Sierra Leonean doctor, Dr. Olivet Buck, had died after having treated patients with Ebola. By then, there had been nearly 2,300 confirmed deaths, with about 150 of them being health care workers at the front line of the epidemic. All Ebola deaths are tragic, and many of …

Features

Notes from Case Zero: Anthropology in the time of Ebola

This article is part of the series:

The lead for a story on the Ebola outbreak is, by now, familiar: on the 22nd of March, the Guinean Ministry of Health declared an outbreak of Ebola, the first ever in the region. The virus has since spread through the countryside and across its borders: west to Sierra Leone, south to Liberia, and most recently, north into Senegal. Cases …

Books

Once More unto the Breach (of capitalism and nature) – jonathan crary’s 24/7

24/7: Late Capitalism and the Ends of Sleep

by Jonathan Crary

Verso Books, 2013. 133 pp.

 

Years ago, I gave a talk at Stanford University, an hour drive north from Santa Cruz. During the question and answer period after the talk, an economist in the audience raised a question about my argument that despite widespread belief in the emergence …