Books

Guillaume Lachenal’s Le médicament qui devait sauver l’Afrique

This article is part of the series:

Lachenal - Cover

Le médicament qui devait sauver l’Afrique

by Guillaume Lachenal

La Découverte, 2014, 250 pages.

 

Guillaume Lachenal’s Le médicament qui devait sauver l’Afrique – the English-language title provided by the publishing house is The hidden history of the medicine meant to save Africa – is devoted to a pharmaceutical scandal in colonial Africa that remains absent from the official history. …

In the Journals

In the Journals, March 2015 – Part 2

Here is a selection of journal articles published toward the end of March. Also check out this month’s first In the Journals post, and Science in Context’s special issue on mind and brain science in the twentieth century.

Disability Studies Quarterly (Open Access) 

Listen and Speak: Power-Knowledge-Truth and Cochlear Implants in Toronto
Tracey Edelist

Cochlear implants and auditory-verbal

Books

Jenell Johnson’s American Lobotomy: A Rhetorical History

americanlobotomycoverAmerican Lobotomy: A Rhetorical History

by Jenell Johnson

University of Michigan Press, 2014, 240 pages.

 

Jenell Johnson’s 2014 book American Lobotomy: A Rhetorical History provides an accessible and thoroughly enjoyable look at how an infamous medical procedure – the lobotomy – developed, was administered, initially applauded, ultimately loathed, and has had an enduring and profound impact upon medicalization of …

Books

William Connolly’s The Fragility of Things

978-0-8223-5584-7_prThe Fragility of Things: Self-organizing Processes, Neoliberal Fantasies, and Democratic Activism

by William E. Connolly

Duke University Press, 2013, 256 pages.

 

In The Fragility of Things: Self-organizing Processes, Neoliberal Fantasies, and Democratic Activism (2013), political theorist William Connolly delivers us into a chaotic world: “a world of becoming in which multiple force fields set on different tiers of chronotime …

Web Roundups

Web Roundup: Weather the Weather

Inspired by yet another prediction of snowfall tonight in Brooklyn, this month’s web roundup will briefly outline some recent looks at climate change. Over at Jacobin, Andreas Malm critiques the Anthropocene narrative’s place in discourse around climate change. Malm writes, “Species-thinking on climate change only induces paralysis. If everyone is to blame, then no one is.” At Aeon, Jedediah Purdy

Features

Experimental anthropology in the making: a conversation with Andreas Roepstorff

Andreas Roepstorff is Professor in Anthropology at Aarhus University in Denmark, where he is also Director of the Interacting Minds Centre. Since the early 2000s, he has pursued an intensely interdisciplinary and collaborative research-programme at the intersections of anthropology, science and technology studies, and cognitive neuroscience – while also using his ethnographic training to reflect back on this his own

BooksFeatures

Book Forum – Bhrigupati Singh’s Poverty and the Quest for Life

This article is part of the series:

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In this next installment of our book forum series, Naveeda Khan has organized a tremendously engaging and challenging set of commentaries on Bhrigupati Singh’s forthcoming book, Poverty and the Quest for Life (Chicago, 2015).  The currents that run between these pieces do not need channeled by a long preface – as will become apparent, these passages already run deep.  …