Features

Anthropology NOW!

As many of you know, the premier edition of Anthropology Now is available online and in print. Now. This journal provides an exciting and important arena for exploring, among other things, cultural aspects of medicine, science and technology. The first issue addresses topics such as the lives of combat veterans from the Iraq War; the upscale store Anthropologie; insect nightmares; gender, affliction and sexuality; and ethics.

The mission of Anthropology Now is to promote anthropological perspectives about contemporary issues and events in a wider and more general public, and to reclaim an active voice in public debate. A second goal is to offer correctives and responses to misappropriations of anthropological research in mass media, popular culture and academia. Because perspectives from cultural anthropology are particularly underrepresented in public debate, the journal will primarily focus on this subfield. I anticipate that the journal will also be a fantastic teaching tool, especially in introductory and undergraduate courses.

What can you and I do to support this wonderful project?
Last week in SF I heard some good ideas from Susan Harding and Emily Martin, who are members of the journal’s Executive committee.

First, spread the word and encourage your library to purchase a subscription.

Second, volunteer skills and labor. As the journal grows, so will the need for people who can help with organizational, editorial, multimedia and other tasks.

Last, but not least, contribute. The journal embraces a range of genres including features, photo essays, reports from the field, excerpts of fieldnotes and articles. The editors and reviewers look for a good story with a sharp opening hook, accessible writing, and a clear anthropological argument that also highlights what the reader can learn about anthropology.

If you are interested in contributing something for publication, email an initial pitch to the general editor Katherine McCaffrey, or to one of the associate editors: Susan Harding, Emily Martin, or Ida Susser. Please include information about the subject you will explore, and how the anthropological perspective will be directed to the general public in terms of content and writing style.


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