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Swine flu, cont.: mini-post

The swine flu outbreak is getting more interesting. I’m particularly compelled by the various trackings, especially because the cultural politics of surveillance–or lack thereof–is emerging as a critical issue. The Google Maps version is a personal favorite. 

Of course, the various economic issues are fascinating as well. Have stock in Tamiflu? 
The WHO is holding a scientific review tomorrow …
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The Unconscious: Metaphor and Metonymy

This article is part of the series:

In his 1930s text, ‘the structure of the unconscious,’ Freud described the unconscious as “a fact without parallel, which defies all explanation or description.” Construed through this very mystifying, if not metaphysical, perspective, the unconscious then remained to be the single most unknowable and more or less untheorizable element of all observable features of human psychology, and of the psychoanalytic …

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Emerging thoughts on swine flu

Globally, the number of cases of swine flu, and deaths attributed to or probably caused by the H1N1 virus are escalating; the microbe is certainly on the move. The BBC has a decent map of the outbreaks. Today, (in an article depicting a cool picture of a thermal scanner at Incheon International Airport in South Korea), The New York Times

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Pharmaceutical Branding is Just Getting Started (Part II/The Sky’s the Limit)

This article is part of the series:

In my previous post on this subject, I pointed out that branding has become more important in the pharmaceutical industry. Implicit to the discussion was the common sense understanding that it is products, and in particular blockbuster drugs, that are branded. This is true, and I will say more in future posts about brand management strategies associated with specific …

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Four Good Questions About Pharmaceutical Industry Reform

This article is part of the series:

In response to my last post, a reader raised several issues that are too important to be buried in a comments section, so I’d like to offer a reply up here. I had said, “most pharmaceutical company executives (and much of the public) do not see themselves as profiteers, but as public servants.” Paul asked: ?

“What kind of …

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Ian Hacking on commercial genome-reading

Chris Kelty at Savage Minds directs our attention to an excellent discussion on commercial genome-reading hosted by the National Humanities Center’s On the Human project. An excellent post by Ian Hacking on genome reading services offered by companies like 23andMe, receives commentary from Paul Rabinow, Gisli Palsson, Norton Wise and others. There is also a follow-up post