AnnouncementsIn the JournalsWeb Roundups

Welcome New Contributors

Somatosphere is pleased to welcome the contributors who will be working on two new (or, newly regular) features: Web Roundups and ‘In the Journals…’.

Web Roundup Contributors

Four new contributors will be working on the Web Roundups. The Web Roundups feature will be a monthly posting to provide commentary on specific issues related to medicine, science and health in contemporary society. Postings will engage with recent scientific and mass media sources to provide readers with a summary and interpretation regarding current hot topics, and a collection of resources about the featured subject matter.

Cassandra Hartblay is a PhD student in Medical Anthropology at the University of North-Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her dissertation research considers disability and citizenship in post-Soviet Russia. The project focuses on the discourses deployed by parent-activists lobbying for inclusive education in the Western city of Petrozavodsk and the Siberian region of Buryatia, and is concerned with resituating Soviet rehabilitation, exclusion and (self-)discipline in the broader context of twentieth century regimes of productivity.

Branwyn Poleykett has a BA in Modern History from Oxford and a Masters in Community Health from the LSE. She is in the post-fieldwork phase of her doctoral project: Intimacy, Technoscience and the City: Regulating Prostitution in Dakar, 1946-2010. Her research traces the history of the sanitary regulation of prostitution in Dakar across the twentieth century as it moves into the clinical spaces and worlds of practice of experimental virologists and urban development professionals.

Georgia Richardson-Melody is currently a second year master’s student in the Anthropology department at Wayne State University, with a concentration in Medical Anthropology. In 2007 she received her B.S. in Anthropology from Eastern Michigan University with a minor in human nutrition. Through her academic pursuits and her past professional experiences as a community nutrition instructor, she developed an interest in reaching beyond the confines of her own cultural understandings of health and wellness, and began to explore other cultural ideologies of health and the diversity in the concepts of healing. Georgia plans to pursue her PhD. in Medical Anthropology and hopes to eventually teach at the college level about culture, health, and illness. Currently, she is interested in the growing field of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) in the United States. Georgia plans to keep her focus on community, food, and nutrition, and she hopes to continue to look at the many ways people meet their nutritional needs, focusing on the cultural, biological, and psychological factors which impact meeting those needs.

Katie Vizenor is a PhD candidate in the Anthropology department at the University at Buffalo. Her dissertation research examines disability community formation and maintenance in virtual worlds. She holds a Master’s in Library and Information Science from the University of Maryland-College Park. As an Informationist and Researcher at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, she advised public health graduate students and faculty on effective uses of information technology to improve their evidence-based practices. She also researched the use of peer reviewed literature by public health workers and proposed strategies to improve access, education and training as part of an National Institutes of Health (NIH) funded project. From 2002-2004, she was a Research Assistant at the Institute for Formal Ontology and Medical Information Science (IFOMIS) in Leipzig, Germany. She lives in Fairfax, Virginia with her husband and daughter.

‘In the Journals…’ Contributors

Six new contributors will be joining current contributor Keahnan Washington to produce the “In the Journals…” feature, a monthly posting that provides a snapshot collection of recent journal publications that of interest to readers of Somatosphere.

Amy Cooper is a PhD candidate in the University of Chicago’s Department of Comparative Human Development. Her research interests include medicine, political activism, everyday life, embodiment, and governmentality, with a focus on Latin America (particularly Venezuela and Cuba).

Keahnan Washington is pursuing an MS in Applied Medical Anthropology through the University of North Texas. Keahnan received an MHS in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and trained at the Hopkins Center for Health Disparities Solutions. His primary goals are alleviating health disparities and health inequalities through applied anthropological research. For his thesis, he is working with an organization that aims to gauge and improve vulnerable workers’ knowledge of their rights relating to workplace health and safety.

Klaartje Klaver is a PhD candidate in the research group Ethics of Care at Tilburg University, NL. Her work concerns an empirical study of ‘attentiveness’ in (hospital) care. Klaartje holds a Master’s degree in both medical anthropology and pedagogical sciences, and is also more broadly interested in professional and informal care practices, transcultural (mental) health care, health systems, family forms, hospital ethnography, and illness experience.

Lara Braff received her PhD from the University of Chicago’s Department of Comparative Human Development in 2010. She is now a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Center for US-Mexican Studies at UCSD. Her ethnographic research examines the cultural implications and lived experiences of globalized biosciences – namely, assisted reproductive technologies and genetic sciences – in Mexico. Her broader research interests include the anthropologies of medicine/health, science/technology, gender/kinship, personhood, and the body.

Melanie Boeckmann, MA, is pursuing a degree in Public Health through the University of Bremen, Germany. Her research interests in the field of international health include nutrition as well as reproductive health.

Sultana Banulescu is a PhD candidate in History at the City University of New York Graduate Center. She holds an MA degree in History of Science from Princeton University, an MS degree in Physiology and Biophysics from the University of Iowa, an MD degree from Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy in Bucharest, Romania, and a BS degree in Biochemistry from the University of Bucharest. Sultana’s dissertation explores the political, religious, and artistic dynamics of Italian psychoanalysis between 1908 and 1948. Her research interests include modern European history, cultural and intellectual history, history of science and medicine, and medical humanities.

Zhiying Ma is a PhD student at the Department of Comparative Human Development, University of Chicago. She is interested in the development of Chinese psychiatry, especially its imagination of and intervention into domesticity, gender, and sexuality. Her dissertation research focuses on the intersection of psychiatry and family in caring for patients diagnosed with psychosis.


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