In the Journals

In the Journals…. July edition (1/2)

Summer issues are out!

The July issue of Health contains a surprising article by Gwendolyn Blue and Melanie Rock of the University of Toronto on “the intermingling of animal and human bodies”. In Trans-biopolitics: Complexity in interspecies relations the authors introduce a framework on global thinking about human-animal power relations with a special focus on zoonotic diseases.
Antje Lindenmeyer, Frances Griffiths and Jean Hodson explore family medical histories and narratives on health in family circles.
Rhonda Shaw examines the question of anonymity in organ donation in New Zealand and questions these anonymity protocols in regard to donor and recipient responses and identities.
In The Rise of Cancer in Urban India: Cultural Understandings, Structural Inequalities and the Emergence of the Clinic, the authors discuss constraints on cancer care delivery in India as identified by Indian oncologists. Broom and Doron embed these issues in, among others, the concept of structural violence.

The International Journal of Social Psychiatry July issue offers a thematic focus on depression. Two articles cover perception of depression in different populations. The first article, How Black African and White British Women Perceive Depression and Help-Seeking: a Pilot Vignette Study, “assess[es] differences in the perceptions of depression of black African and white British women that may influence lower detection and to investigate whether there are ethnic group differences in reasons for not seeking formal help” (from the abstract). In Community and Health Professionals’ Attitude Toward Depression: a Pilot Study in Nine Eaad Countries, perception of depression is studied from the caregiver’s point of view.
Gottlieb, Waitzkin and Miranda performed a qualitative systematic review of contextual interventions for depression.
More from this journal:
Psychological Distress Among Immigrants and Visible Minorities in Canada: a Contextual Analysis, Stigmatization of ‘psychiatric label’ by medical and non-medical students and
Service users’ personal experience and interpretation of mental illness: Oriental narratives.

In a recent article in the Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, Kevin A. Jernigan argues that dieting is an important aspect of healing among speakers of the endangered Amazonian language Iquito. Food use is also of interest to Hailemichael Shewayrga and Peter A Sopade. The authors conducted fieldwork in Northern Ethiopia on barley and its use as (health) food as well as in ethnobotany (Ethnobotany, diverse food uses, claimed health benefits and implications on conservation of barley landraces in North Eastern Ethiopia highlands).

In the July issue of the Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences war, aggression and control play a prominent role. Military medicine as well as eugenics are discussed in these three articles: Eugenics for the Doctors: Medicine and Social Control in 1930s Turkey, Shooting Disabled Soldiers: Medicine and Photography in World War I America and Realizing Major William Borden’s Dream: Military Medicine, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, and Its Wounded Warriors, 1909–2009. A fourth article analyzes a history of malaria control in Liberia.

Reviewing current articles in Medical Anthropology, I was reminded of a recent episode of Grey’s Anatomy and its portrayal of a traffic accident as the journal contains an invited editorial on death from car accidents. The article Aging Disaster: Mortality, Vulnerability, and Long-Term Recovery among Katrina Survivors investigates a large-scale disaster, while Facing Victims: Forensics, Visual Technologies, and Sexual Assault Examination discusses forensic photography in the evidence collecting process after sexual assault. How we talk about medical issues is the subject of interest both in Taking Humor Seriously: Talking about Drinking in Native American Focus Groups and in Can You Keep a Secret? Pretences of Confidentiality in HIV/AIDS Counseling and Treatment in Eastern Indonesia.


One Response to In the Journals…. July edition (1/2)

  1. Pingback: In the journals and on the web in 2011 | Somatosphere

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