Features

A Conversation with Karen Nakamura

[This article is being cross-posted at the blogs of the Foundation for Psychocultural Research (FPR) and the FPR-UCLA Center for Culture, Brain, Development and Mental Health (CBDMH). Thanks to the FPR’s Constance Cummings for sharing this post with Somatosphere].

Science writer Karen A. Frenkel interviews anthropologist Karen Nakamura for the FPR.

 

Karen Nakamura is Associate Professor of Anthropology and

Books

Book review: Liah Greenfeld’s Mind, Modernity, Madness

Mind, Modernity, Madness: The Impact of Culture on Human Experience

Liah Greenfeld

Harvard University Press, 2013.

688pp., US $45.00, hardcover

 

According to Liah Greenfeld, author of Mind, Modernity, Madness, “culture is an empirical reality of the first order in human life – that it, in the most profound sense of the word makes us human and defines …

Books

Todd Meyers’ The Clinic and Elsewhere

Todd Meyers, our own book review editor here at Somatosphere and Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Wayne State University, has written a phenomenal book titled The Clinic and Elsewhere: Addiction, Adolescents, and the Afterlife of Therapy, which should be on the bookshelf of any social scientist interested in biomedicine’s clinical practices and spaces, as well as, of course, …

FeaturesTeaching Resources

Videos of “Cultural Psychiatry: A Critical Introduction”

As I’ve written about on this site before, one of the best short programs for anyone interested in culture and mental health is the Summer School in Social and Cultural Psychiatry held annually at McGill.  The course at the center of the curriculum is “Cultural Psychiatry: A Critical Introduction” which consists primarily of lectures by Laurence Kirmayer, Allan Young

FeaturesTeaching Resources

Videos from “Critical Neuroscience” course

I’ve written in the past (here and here) about the Critical Neuroscience project – an effort led by a group of social and biological scientists and philosophers to develop “a reflexive scientific practice that responds to the social, cultural and political challenges posed by the advances in the behavioural and brain sciences,” (Choudhury, Nagel and Slaby 2009