Features

Somatosphere in 2017

As 2018 begins we pause to briefly look back at the posts that appeared in the past year on Somatosphere. Last year we were happy to publish a number of excellent series, including “Toxicity, Waste, and Detritus in the Global South: Africa and Beyond,” edited by Gabrielle Hecht and Pamila Gupta, “Critical Histories, Activist Futures,” edited by Tess Lanzarotta and Sarah M. Pickman, “The First 1,000 Days of Life,” edited by Michelle Pentecost and Fiona C. Ross, and “Speculative Health,” edited by Matthew Wolf-Meyer, as well as a raft of other book reviews, book forums, and other pieces.

A huge thanks to all of the entire editorial team, our contributors, and to our readers! We’re very excited for 2018. In the coming days we’ll have a series responding to the recent #7wordsCDC story; we’ll also be continuing our numerous series and publishing forums on recent books by Alondra Nelson, Des Fitzgerald and Fernando Vidal and Francisco Ortega. And later in the year we celebrate the 10th anniversary of the site…. so there’s a lot to look forward to!

 

Toxicity, Waste, and Detritus in the Global South: Africa and Beyond

Edited by Gabrielle Hecht and Pamila Gupta

Short adventures into our planet’s toxic sensorium, by Africanists and some of their scholarly kin.

 

Critical Histories, Activist Futures

Edited by Tess Lanzarotta and Sarah Pickman

This series is our attempt to capture some of the insights, suggestions, critiques and experiences from a conference entitled “Critical Histories, Activist Futures: Science, Medicine and Racial Violence.”

 

Aftermath

A series examining the consequences of recent nationalist political turns throughout the world, including the US election.

 

First 1,000 Days of Life

Edited by Michelle Pentecost and Fiona C. Ross

Exploring “the ways that a global health initiative driven by new findings in epigenetics and neuroscience and by a reframing of theories about health and disease in terms of developmental origins shape ideas about (global) health and population futures, invigorate campaigns, and take form and settle in localized contexts.”

 

Speculative Health

Edited by Matthew Wolf-Meyer

Examining “how speculation makes particular kinds of persons and social forms possible; to think though other models and modes of speculation about the body, health, and disease — in film, literature, and mass media; to consider how particular technologies and techniques create futures.”

 

Experiments with pedagogy

Edited by Hannah Kienzler

 

Top of the heap

 

Features

 

Book forums

 

 

 

 

Book reviews and essays

Edited by Seth Messinger

 

Web Roudups

Edited by Lily Shapiro

 

In the Journals

Edited by Anna Zogas

 


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