Lectures

Punctuated Lives – Staying Healthy with Lynch Syndrome

This article is part of the series:

Every two years, a letter from the Gastroenterology unit drops into Maria’s mailbox. It is a call to attend her regular surveillance colonoscopy to check for potential precancerous polyps which are very likely to grow in Maria’s colon. Maria has Lynch Syndrome, an inherited genetic mutation in one of the mismatch repair genes (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2) that significantly …

Lectures

The Future of (Academic) Conferencing

From the 4th to the 6th of March 2021, close to 500 medical anthropologists, sociologists, STS scholars and more participated in the Chronic Living conference, yet never at the same time as one collective group of participants. The conference had been originally planned to take place in Copenhagen in April 2020 leading to a last-minute cancellation and …

Lectures

Chronic living: ethnographic explorations of daily lives swayed by (multiple) medical conditions

This article is part of the series:

On the 12th of January 2020, the World Health Organization confirmed that the “mystery virus” which, according to reports from China, had infected some 50 people in the city of Wuhan, was not SARS following the genetic sequencing of a “novel coronavirus”. Within two weeks, Wuhan’s hospitals were overwhelmed, and the city was sent into lockdown as health authorities …

Features

Knowledge of living

It is time we anthropologists of biomedicine broaden our analytical scope. If it is the case that there is more to life than DNA, cells, tissues and organs; that there is more to disease than mutations, dysregulations and dysfunctions, then how is it that social studies of medicine have attained such a bio bent in recent decades? Of course, medicine …