In the Journals

In The Journals, November 2021, Part 1

The standout themes of this month are: the varying meanings of wellness and well-being, and Covid 19’s effect: on local populations, women and domestic violence, caregivers, and therapy over Zoom. In honor of International Persons with Disabilities Day (Dec. 3rd), I draw your attention to Medical Anthropology’s article about disability access and the Berlin transport system. Happy Reading.

Annals of

In the Journals

In The Journals, March 2021, Part 1

BioSocieties

Sportswomen as ‘biocultural creatures’: understanding embodied health experiences across sporting cultures
Holly Thorpe, Marianne Clark & Julie Brice

Over the past decade, a critical mass of feminist scholars has been working to develop new ways of understanding the complex interactions between the social and biological body. Working broadly under the umbrella of ‘new materialisms,’ a subgroup of feminist scholars

In the Journals

In The Journals, November 2020, Part 2

Cultural Anthropology (Open Access) 

Birthing from Within: nature, Technology, and Self-Making in Silicon Valley Childbearing

Andrea Ford 

Through examining childbearing in California’s Silicon Valley, this article describes how seeking “self-actualization” has become a rite of passage for contemporary childbearing people. This approach undermines distinctions between “technological” and “natural” approaches to birth, as people are coached to leverage both logistical and

In the Journals

In The Journals, August 2019

A short round up this month. This month’s collection will be most valuable for those interested in topics such as: childbirth, immigration and health, disability and Disability Studies, and Public Health.

Health, Risk, and Society

Caesarean or vaginarean epidemics ? Techno-birth, risk and obstetric practice in Turkey (Open Access)
Sezin Topçu

Caesarean sections (C-sections) have become a substitute for vaginal

In the Journals

In The Journals, January 2019

The January roundup from the journals. Happy Reading!

Body & Society

Why Kinesthesia, Tactility and Affectivity Matter: Critical and Constructive Perspectives

Maxine Sheets-Johnstone

This article offers critical and constructive perspectives essential to understanding living bodies, and, in effect, to showing that kinesthesia, tactility and affectivity matter because they are central to animate life. Critical perspectives focus on practices that distance