Lectures

Reworking the Cognitive Bias – a Brainstorm

This article is part of the series:

Can we change the way that we think about thinking? Can we rework our thoughts about thought? If so, what would reworking thought open up, analytically and ethnographically? Those were the provocations we started with, an invitation to draw together early career researchers working on diverse ways of conceptualizing thinking and not-thinking, cognizing and not-cognizing. 

Even asking these questions raises …

Lectures

Don’t Fight the Future

This article is part of the series:

For the last few years, I’ve been teaching a class called “Human Futures.” I designed it because I was struck by the increasing pessimism among the undergraduates I taught, many of whom expressed deep anxieties about the future. I wanted to provide them with a curriculum that was both realist in its assessment of the threats we collectively …

Announcements

CfP (AAA 2019): Reworking the Cognitive Bias in and out of Biomedicine

This year, we at Somatosphere are trying an experiment in academic mentorship. Two of our regular contributors and editorial collaborative members, Emily Yates-Doerr and Matthew Wolf-Meyer, are hosting a panel designed to ease early-career anthropologists (broadly defined) into academic publishing. The idea is to bring together scholars interested in analyzing cognition or cognitive-related practices ethnographically (see the CFP below), with …

Features

Respect, care, and labor in collaborative scholarly projects

As members of Somatosphere’s Editorial Collaborative, we have been following the unfolding crisis surrounding Hau with profound concern (Agro 2018, Flaherty 2018). As others have noted, this crisis has revealed multiple structural issues that deserve intense engagement beyond the specifics of the individual case: open-access (OA), digital scholarship and publication, yes, but also academic power, precarity, and vulnerability;

Features

What’s At Stake in Speculation?

This article is part of the series:

We’ve long been thinking about health, well-being, illness, sickness, and disease, in relation to risk. That things might not be maintained at their present levels, either individually, among our cared-for, or socially, is not something new, even if we’ve entered a period of intensification, with calls to ‘repeal and replace’ the Affordable Care Act, and the slow, often subtle chipping …

Announcements

Speculative Health

This article is part of the series:

The last thirty years have seen an intensification in ways of thinking about our health and disease in the future tense. Risk, precarity, subjunctivity — all three point to the ways that temporality shape human experience, subjectively, interpersonally, and institutionally. But what if we turn our attention away from the clinic and its therapeutic technologies — which focus on the …