In the Journals

In the Journals May 2016 Part II

Part I can be found here. 

Social Science & Medicine 

Where the lay and the technical meet: Using an anthropology of interfaces to explain persistent reproductive health disparities in West Africa

Yannick Jaffré, Siri Suh

Despite impressive global investment in reproductive health programs in West Africa, maternal mortality remains unacceptably high and obstetric care is often inadequate. Fertility is among

In the Journals

In the Journals May 2016 Part I

Following Anna’s post on current special issues, here are abstracts from this month’s journal outputs.

American Ethnologist

Skill and masculinity in Olympic weightlifting: Training cues and cultivated craziness in Georgia

Perry Sherouse

At the Georgian Weightlifting Federation in Tbilisi, Georgia, a mainstay of coaching is the training cue, a shouted word or phrase that coaches use to prompt weightlifters to

In the Journals

In the Journals, February 2016 Part I

This month’s reading list, part I

American Ethnologist

The 2015 Refugee Crisis in Europe: Forum

Representing the “European refugee crisis” in Germany and beyond: Deservingness and difference, life and death

Seth M. Holmes, Heide Castaneda

The European refugee crisis has gained worldwide attention with daily media coverage both in and outside Germany. Representations of refugees in media and political discourse

In the Journals

In the Journals December 2015 – Part II

Find the first half of December’s post here.

New Genetics and Society

Beyond and within public engagement: a broadened approach to engagement in biobanking

Jose A. Cañada, Aaro Tupasela, Karoliina Snell

Social studies on biobanking have traditionally focused on public engagement, that is, engagement with donors, patients and the general public as an important factor of sustainability. In this

In the Journals

In the Journals: September (Part 2)

Health, Risk & Society

Towards a better understanding of risk-taking: key concepts, dimensions and perspectives

Jens O. Zinn

The current study of risk is dominated by the risk minimisation approach that frames risk and risk-taking as something undesirable that should be avoided as much as possible. However, this approach to risk often fails to consider the broader conditions and motivations