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Top of the Heap: Paul Rabinow

This article is part of the series:

For this installment of the Top of the Heap series, I spoke with Paul M. Rabinow, who is a Professor of medical and sociocultural anthropology at the University of California at Berkeley.

 

Alexander Kluge & Oskar Negt, History and Obstinacy, translated by Richard Langston et.al., edited and with an introduction by Devon Fore, Cambridge: Zone Books, 2014.

Michael …

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Maurizio Meloni’s “Political Biology: Science and Social Values in Human Heredity from Eugenics to Epigenetics”

political-biology-coverPolitical Biology: Science and Social Values in Human Heredity from Eugenics to Epigenetics

Maurizio Meloni

Palgrave MacMilllan, 2016, 284 pages

 

In Political Biology, Maurizio Meloni, one of our most insightful social theorists of contemporary biology, guides us through heredity from the second half of the nineteenth century, through the twentieth “century of the gene” (Keller, 2000) and …

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Tarek Elhaik’s The Incurable Image: Curating Post-Mexican Film and Media Arts

incurable-image-coverThe Incurable-Image: Curating Post-Mexican Film and Media Arts

by Tarek Elhaik

Edinburgh University Press, 2016, 198 pages

 

Tarek Elhaik’s first book—an ethnographic examination of multi-media artists, curators, and fellow anthropologists loosely centered around Mexico City—is a bold, highly theoretical effort to revive something of the experimental ethos of Writing Culture (Clifford and Marcus 1986) and the works that …

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Book Forum––Robert Desjarlais’ Subject to Death: Life and Loss in a Buddhist World

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9780226355870
 
 
Robert Desjarlais’s Subject to Death is like stepping onto a train already in motion. Its momentum isn’t fierce but there’s no time to ease in––from its first pages, as readers we find ourselves in the midst of death and life and loss as they take and are given form. At the risk of overusing the term, there is great care
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Top of the Heap: Matthew Kohrman

This article is part of the series:

[For this instalment of the Top of the Heap series, I spoke with medical anthropologist and Associate Professor Matthew Kohrman from Stanford University.]

Summer has arrived in North America. Catching up on academic reading is not my first priority at the moment. May it be yours! If so, here are a few texts among the many that have been beckoning …

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Top of the Heap: Zoë H. Wool

This article is part of the series:

For this installment of the Top of the Heap series, I spoke with Zoë H. Wool, who is a medical anthropologist and assistant professor at Rice University in Texas.

The invitation to contribute to the Top of the Heap felt like such a treat…and then sent me into a tailspin of professional anxiety (Alexander I. Stingl laid out the dilemma …