BooksFeatures

Book Forum––Introduction, Jeremy Greene’s “Generic”

This article is part of the series:

Welcome to our inaugural “Book Forum.”  Our aim is simple: to promote lively exchange between a group of scholars and an author, allowing for experimental and inventive engagements that are not so much about evaluation but rather draw on concepts and shared commitments.  It’s probably worth noting that Somatosphere will continue to feature book reviews, which have been a mainstay …

Books

Joseph Dumit’s Drugs for Life

Drugs for Life: How Pharmaceutical Companies Define Our Health

by Joseph Dumit

Duke University Press, 2012. pp. 280.

Since the 1970s, scholarly work on pharmaceuticals has long engaged a number of concerns, debates and controversies: the socialities and politics of consumption, the commercialization of the life sciences, and restricted access to life-saving medicines as a result of global patent and …

Books

Top of the heap: Sarah Willen

This article is part of the series:


For this installment of “Top of the heap,” we spoke to Sarah Willen, Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Director of the Human Rights Institute’s Research Program on Global Health and Human Rights at the University of Connecticut.

Sarah Willen

This summer I found myself puzzling deeply over the notion of dignity. In fields like political philosophy, bioethics, law, …

Books

Once More unto the Breach (of capitalism and nature) – jonathan crary’s 24/7

24/7: Late Capitalism and the Ends of Sleep

by Jonathan Crary

Verso Books, 2013. 133 pp.

 

Years ago, I gave a talk at Stanford University, an hour drive north from Santa Cruz. During the question and answer period after the talk, an economist in the audience raised a question about my argument that despite widespread belief in the emergence …

Books

Alexander Etkind’s Warped Mourning

Warped Mourning: Stories of the Undead in the Land of the Unburied

by Alexander Etkind

Stanford University Press, 2013; 328 pages.

 

Scholars of social and cultural memory in the post-Soviet space are well aware of the Memory at War project—the international collaborative effort to understand battles over memory as they were waged in postsocialist Poland, Russia, and Ukraine. …

Books

Deborah Weinstein’s The Pathological Family

The Pathological Family: Postwar America and the Rise of Family Therapy

by Deborah Weinstein

Cornell University Press, 2013. 280 pages.


In ‘The Pathological Family’, Deborah Weinstein argues that in mid-20th century America, researchers and clinicians developed a new mode of therapy to treat families focusing on structural and relational aspects of family life.  In doing so, they implicitly acknowledged …