Features

The Testing Revolution: Investigating Diagnostic Devices in Global Health

This article is part of the series:

Image by Alice Street in collaboration with Jennifer Littlejohn.

The origins of laboratory medicine are often traced to the establishment of a small clinical laboratory in Guy’s Hospital, London, in 1828. Here, in a small side-room, medical students used sterilisers, incubators and microscopes to identify bacteriological organisms in biological samples taken from the patients in the ward next door. In …

Features

Conjuring Madness: Self/Non Self and Mental Illness in Post-Apartheid Namibia

Il convient plutot de s’attacher à ce que signifie ȇtre un homme, avant de problématiser la folie en terms de santé et maladie, Ludwig Binswanger, Le Rȇve et l’Existence (1954)

 

On a cold winter morning I walked on Independence Avenue, Windhoek’s main thoroughfare in the heart of the capital’s central business district, with M. …

Features

Mapping new voices: Towards a Latin American perspective on Global Mental Health

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This article describes the creation of a collaborative initiative started by PhD students interested in mental health issues in Latin America. It reports on its first workshop “Mapping new voices. Towards a Latin American perspective in Global Mental Health” held at the Maison de Sciences de l’Homme in Paris on the 26-27 of June 2017. The article is collaboratively authored

Features

Reaching Out, Looking In: On Research, Refusal, and Responsibility

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The papers in this series, “Critical Histories, Activist Futures,” have captured some of the exciting conversations that took place during a conference titled “Critical Histories, Activist Futures: Science, Medicine, and Racial Violence,” which was held at Yale University in February 2017. As my colleague Sarah M. Pickman has explained, the conference was intended to create a space for …

BooksFeatures

Book Forum––Fernando Vidal and Francisco Ortega’s Being Brains: Making the Cerebral Subject

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Fernando Vidal and Francisco Ortega’s Being Brains: Making the Cerebral Subject is a fine-grained account of the “neuro-” in a range of disciplines, and, importantly––crucially––, takes stock of the history and scope of this prefix.  But more than this the book is an exploration, a critical engagement with the surge of brain-centered approaches to behavior, to physiology, to mind, …