FeaturesLectures

Writing Life No. 5: An interview with Robert Desjarlais

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Photo by Robert Desjarlais

“British poet W.H Auden suggested that true poets are those who like ‘hanging around words listening to what they say.”

Desjarlais, 2011, Counterplay: An Anthropologist at the Chess Board,15.

At the Paris Institute of Advanced Studies, where Robert is currently a research fellow, it is 3:30 p.m. We meet online to discuss how to …

Lectures

A Hospital Without People in a Timor-Leste Community

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‘If you are bleeding a lot…go to hospital’. Cristiano, a community health volunteer gave a health seminar to 12 community members inside a dark concrete house, in a village outside a small town in Timor-Leste’s central mountains. Cristiano explained some of the danger signals to watch out for during pregnancy. ‘Go to hospital’, Cristiano repeated, as he described each symptom …

Lectures

Writing Life No. 4: An interview with Tom Rice

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Figure 1: One of Tom’s writing space, Exeter, UK

“An acoustemologist, that’s probably the best professional description for me” – Tom Rice is a Senior Lecturer at the Department of Sociology, Philosophy and Anthropology at the University of Exeter, with a research focus on the anthropology of sound. Ever since childhood, sound has been important to him, but working as …

Lectures

Doing and Seeing: Cultivating a “Fractured Habitus” through Reflexive Clinician Ethnography

Introduction

The tension between critical theoretical innovation and on-the-ground, practical application has animated intense debate in medical anthropology (Scheper-Hughes 1990). Epistemological and methodological conflicts cropping up at the intersection of medicine and anthropology, though central considerations for all medical anthropologists, represent an inescapable source of tension for MD/PhD clinician-ethnographers. While innovative manuscripts produced by such scholars (Wendland 2019) have illustrated …

Lectures

Writing Life No. 3: An interview with Janelle Taylor

This article is part of the series:
Figure 1: Janelle’s chair, with writing and knitting projects underway

The conversation began on a summer day in a 13th Century chateau, with a moat, on the outskirts of Maastricht in the Netherlands. Janelle Taylor was leading a writing workshop with Jeremy Greene and Rachel Prentice, as part of a larger event for the ERC-funded project Making Clinical

Lectures

The Thinness of Care: The Promise of Medical Anthropology in MD/PhD Training

In the mid-twentieth century, recognizing the growing need for innovations born of clinical experience, pathways for training MD-PhD physician-scientists emerged in the hopes that this hybrid training could produce novel insights into disease and ultimately, treatments. In the years since formal MD/PhD training programs were established, a growing number of institutions have established pathways for a combination with non-traditional disciplines, …