Lectures

The Two Singapores: Spectacle and Twin Realities

This article is part of the series:

Early on in the global fight against COVID-19, Singapore’s response to the pandemic, centered around aggressive contact tracing and quarantining close contacts, was the subject of praise and admiration among the global community. However, much of this international sentiment had died out by April, as Singapore saw steeply rising infection rates in migrant worker dormitories around the country. Today, low-wage

Lectures

Reworking the Cognitive Bias – a Brainstorm

This article is part of the series:

Can we change the way that we think about thinking? Can we rework our thoughts about thought? If so, what would reworking thought open up, analytically and ethnographically? Those were the provocations we started with, an invitation to draw together early career researchers working on diverse ways of conceptualizing thinking and not-thinking, cognizing and not-cognizing. 

Even asking these questions raises …

Lectures

Science Skepticism as a Veneer for Nationalistic Humor

This article is part of the series:

Recently we saw a splash of headlines about the Russian Covid-19 vaccine, as Russia became the first country to register a vaccine and governmental officials shared plans for starting mass vaccinations in October. This news was shared all over my social media, with the commentary hewing to repetitive jokes, the humor value of which was based on an implied shared …

Lectures

Standards and urgency in times of pandemics: hydroxychloroquine as a pharmaceutical and political artefact

This article is part of the series:

Separated by two meters of water from the crowd, Brazil’s President Jair Bolsonaro, infected by COVID-19 and wearing his mask, rallied up his supporters, “If by chance your mother or grandfather catches it, will they take chloroquine or not?”

“They will!” shouted back the crowd in unison, across the narrow strip of water.

Hydroxychloroquine has turned from being a commonly …

Lectures

‘Stolen Spring’: Danish elders in plejehjemem under COVID-19 visiting restrictions

This article is part of the series:

First published in 1940, Hans Scherfig’s The Stolen Spring (Det Forsømte Forår) is both a satirical crime novel and a wry social commentary. Through his description of a school’s sociocultural dynamics and how administrators handle the murder of a teacher, Scherfig pointedly criticises particular patterns and structures in Danish society. As one reviewer wrote: “The small, scared …

Lectures

Chemical Sensitivity

Sitting at a table in his home in Snowflake, Arizona, Steen reads a book encased in a clear, plastic box. The front of the box is fitted with two holes to which latex gloves have been attached. Steen inserts his hands into these gloves and demonstrates how he turns the book’s pages using wooden pencils inside the box. When asked …