Web Roundups

Web Roundup: Ebola Update

This article is part of the series:

A great deal has happened since the first Web Roundup on Ebola. The epidemic has spread both in West Africa and globally, and material about Ebola has spread throughout the web. According to the CDC, as of October 22, a total of 9911 cases of Ebola have been reported, primarily in Liberia, Guinea, and Sierra Leone (map

Web Roundups

Web Roundup: Ebola

This article is part of the series:

When I teach Medical Anthropology, we talk about globalization and infectious disease, with a focus on the increasing speed of global travel. Typically, I discuss a hypothetical epidemic that could accompany a traveller from a distant continent to the local airport. This year, a hypothetical epidemic will not be necessary. Instead, we have the rapid spread of Ebola, poised to …

Web Roundups

Web Roundup: Organ Transfer in Open Spaces

July’s web roundup will focus on recent conversations around organ transfer and its public perception.  Organ transfer, with its complex and oftentimes invisible circuits of body parts, donors, recipients, doctors, markets and the state, is particularly ripe for intervention by social scientists. Ethan Watters’ profile of anthropologist Nancy Scheper-Hughes at Pacific Standard says that her work on organ transfer was, …

Web Roundups

Dear Patient, tell me a story

This month’s web roundup will take the opportunity to discuss “Narrative Medicine.” In “The Art of Narrative Medicine,” the editors of the blog of The American Resident Project write that “Over the past six years, narrative medicine and the physicians who have worked to enhance and promote its efficacy have gained traction within the mainstream health care system.”

Back in …

Web Roundups

Web Roundup: Accidents and myths

What role do accidents play in determining our lives and histories? What, even, is an accident? How does something come to be thought of as “accidental”? This month’s Web Roundup features stories on accidents and their aftermath.

Starting us off, Slate has an excellent article about Phineas Gage, the most famous patient of neurosurgery ever. For those who don’t …