Features

Climate Change and Planetary Health

This article is part of the series:

Five years ago, the University College London Commission concluded that climate change is the biggest threat to human health in the 21st century. Health has entered a new epoch in which environmental factors, under adverse human influence, must become the focus worldwide.  This recognition sparked the planetary health initiative, spearheaded by The Lancet, which is motivated by acceptance …

Features

New series: Climate change and health

This article is part of the series:

Climate change and human health is a topic of growing popularity and urgency in the public health community. In its draft twelfth working program the WHO repeatedly links climate change to negative health impacts, and the working group II report of the 5th Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) assessment report dedicates a chapter to the effects of climate change …

In the Journals

New Modes of Understanding and Acting on Human Difference in Autism Research, Advocacy, and Care — A special issue of BioSocieties

The current issue of BioSocieties is a special issue, entitled “New Modes of Understanding and Acting on Human Difference in Autism Research, Advocacy, and Care” and edited by Gil Eyal, Des Fitzgerald, Eva Gillis-Buck, Brendan Hart, Martine D. Lappé, Daniel Navon and Sarah S. Richardson. Abstracts and links to the articles are below….

New modes of understanding and

Books

Alexander Etkind’s Warped Mourning

Warped Mourning: Stories of the Undead in the Land of the Unburied

by Alexander Etkind

Stanford University Press, 2013; 328 pages.

 

Scholars of social and cultural memory in the post-Soviet space are well aware of the Memory at War project—the international collaborative effort to understand battles over memory as they were waged in postsocialist Poland, Russia, and Ukraine. …

Books

Deborah Weinstein’s The Pathological Family

The Pathological Family: Postwar America and the Rise of Family Therapy

by Deborah Weinstein

Cornell University Press, 2013. 280 pages.


In ‘The Pathological Family’, Deborah Weinstein argues that in mid-20th century America, researchers and clinicians developed a new mode of therapy to treat families focusing on structural and relational aspects of family life.  In doing so, they implicitly acknowledged …