Features

Residue

Waste and toxicity are foundational categories of knowledge for the Anthropocene. Consider how natural scientists approach the topic. Empirically, the “great acceleration” they’ve identified corresponds to a massive increase in human-generated wastes: carbon molecules, toxic chemicals, radioactive particles, plastics, and much more. Measuring molecular concentrations of these materials, and mapping these measurements onto models of earth systems (such as the …

Features

Public health politicised: A response to the politics of CDC language and implications for global health, wellbeing and inequalities

This article is part of the series:

In this response we address how the recent language controversy surrounding the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) must be considered as part of a broader politicisation of public health services used by women and minority groups in the US context, which has international implications given the influential position of the CDC in global health governance. Our individual areas …

Features

Beyond “Banned Words”: The CDC, Trump’s Anti-Science, and Anthropological Outrage

This article is part of the series:

I am delighted that anthropologists joined the debate unleashed by a story published in the Washington Post on 15 December 2017, in which health reporter Lena Sun and politics correspondent Juliet Eilperin suggested that “The Trump administration is prohibiting officials at the nation’s top public health agency from using a list of seven words or phrases … in official documents …

In the Journals

In the Journals – December 2017

Happy new year! This post rounds off Somatosphere’s 2017 “In the Journals,” with articles published in December. Enjoy!

Medical Anthropology Quarterly

(In)Visibility Online: The Benefits of Online Patient Forums for People with a Hidden Illness: The Case of Multiple Chemical Sensitivity (MCS)
Tarrryn Phillips, Tyson Rees

Sufferers of medically unexplained conditions that are not observable in the clinic can experience …

Web Roundups

Web Roundup: Gender and Health

Nothing seems to be more self-evident than gender differences, and yet when we have to establish what these differences are, things seem to become complicated. Is it the reproductive system that clearly determines if we love pink or blue? Perhaps it is the endocrine system? Or is it the genes that are different?

Feminist research started decades ago to build