Features

Integration

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In one of several letters he wrote to me during my fieldwork, Serge addressed what he considered to be the problems of integration for disabled people in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Writing this letter in November 2013, he reflected on the upcoming International Day of Persons with Disabilities on the 3rdof December. “Across the world,” he wrote, …

Features

Why we must go beyond focusing on the ‘overrepresentation’ of racialized people in HIV criminalization

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We can trace an unbroken record of injustice back through generations, to our grandfathers and our grandmothers, our great-grandfathers and to those before them. We can trace them back to the time when a label was put on our people, legitimate victim. Other people learned that they could victimize us and nothing would happen because the laws, your laws, did

Books

Elana D. Buch’s Inequalities of Aging: Paradoxes of Independence in American Home Care

Inequalities of Aging: Paradoxes of Independence In American Home Care

Elana D. Buch

New York University Press, 2018. 263 pages.

Elana Buch’s critical and thoughtful analysis of the American home care system highlights the ways in which older adults try to simultaneously maintain their independent identities and generate new relations with the home care workers who assist them with assigned …

In the Journals

Ethos Special Thematic Collection: “Extraordinary Conditions, Global Psychiatric Care, and Moral Subjectivity”

The March 2019 issue of Ethos, organized by Neely Myers and Kristin E. Yarris, focuses on “Extraordinary Conditions, Global Psychiatric Care, and Moral Subjectivity.” The collection closes with commentary by Elizabeth Bromley and Cheryl Mattingly.

Beyond the “Crazy House”: Mental/Moral Breakdowns and Moral Agency in First‐Episode Psychosis
Neely Myers

This paper draws on a two‐year, longitudinal, prospective study of

Features

Disrupted connections: On participation in caring for a mother with dementia

On a sunny, stifling afternoon, my friend, an Ayurvedic doctor, ushers me into a scantily furnished examining room of his clinic in central Kerala, South India. There, a small, stout woman sits on a chair. Her name is Mercy.1 She is wearing a salwar kameez, an outfit comprising of a long shirt, baggy pants and a scarf, rather …

Features

development

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Umm Adnan,[i] like many women I met during my research on Down Syndrome and kinship in Jordan, was extremely protective of her son Adnan. The youngest of four, Adnan was constantly battling sickness. His health issues, in conjunction with Down Syndrome, marked the toddler as especially vulnerable, and Umm Adnan reacted by cultivating her own brand of fierce maternal …