Features

Graphic Anthropology Field School

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The Graphic Anthropology Field School (GrAFs) is a project launched by Expeditions, an independent network of scholars in the human sciences. For 11 years, we have been holding in Gozo (Malta) a summer school for anthropologists and social scientists, focused on the practice of fieldwork. Far away from sleepy lectures in gloomy classrooms, our aim has always been to …

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Creative Collaborations: The Making of “Lissa (Still Time):  a graphic medical ethnography of friendship, loss, and revolution”

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Is there a widely accessible yet conceptually rigorous way to convey anthropological insights into the lived complexities and bioethical dilemmas that attend managing chronic illness in two vastly different contexts: the contemporary Arab world and the United States? As it turns out, there is: comics. At the time we began to explore this question, we had both been excited by …

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Comics and the Medical Encounter

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Editor’s Note: In March of 2013 the Annals of Internal Medicine added the Graphic Medicine series as part of their medical humanities features. As they describe, “Annals Graphic Medicine brings together original graphic narratives, comics, animation/feature, and other creative forms by those who provide or receive health care.” Most often the stories are from a physician’s own experiences and

BooksFeatures

Graphic Medicine Manifesto

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title image graphic medicine

In organizing the 6th Annual Conference of Comics and Medicine, I frequently heard the refrain “Comics and medicine? What’s that? How do those two things go together?” Indeed, I even heard that comment from the comic book store manager whom I had asked to sell selected books at the conference. The Graphic Medicine Manifesto (2015) is a brilliant response …

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Image as Method: Conversations on Anthropology through the Image

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What follows is a series of conversations conducted after the recent Image as Method symposium, which took place on May 4th and 5th, 2015, at Columbia Universitys Heyman Center for the Humanities, organized by Brian Goldstone. The symposium featured numerous presenters and commentators: Diana Allan, Vincent Crapanzano, Robert Desjarlais, Angela Garcia, Gökç

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Image + Text – a new series

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from Judith Vanistendael, When David Lost His Voice.  London: Self Made Hero Press, 2012.

from Judith Vanistendael, When David Lost His Voice. (London: Self Made Hero Press, 2012).

Comics and graphic narratives have grown in popularity over the past few decades, not just in the public but in academic writing and thinking as well. The recent publications of Comics & Media (Chute and Jagoda 2014), Graphic Medicine Manifesto, (Czerwiec, Williams, Squier, et al …