Features

On Deanthropologizing Anthropology — An Essay on Tarek Elhaik’s “The Incurable Image”

This article is part of the series:

“Are cultural anthropologists ready to shed their habit of using society and culture? (…) No, I don’t feel so. (…) It seems to me that many anthropologists wish to keep the human (…). There is a tricky problem here: concentrating around the human could mean either maintaining this character apart from other entities — the former beings of ‘nature’ defining

Books

Kristin Peterson’s Speculative Markets: Drug Circuits and Derivative Life in Nigeria

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speculative marketsSpeculative Markets: Drug Circuits and Derivative Life in Nigeria

by Kristin Peterson

Duke University Press, 2014, 256 pages.

Chemical Arbitrage

We tend to think of pharmaceuticals as chemical matter caught up in complicated legal and economic relationships, but it is probably more useful to think of them as legal artifacts oriented towards a potential (but by no means guaranteed) biochemical …

Books

Beyond Chronicity and Culpability: Toward A New Ethic of Care

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A Commentary on Angela Garcia’s The Pastoral Clinic: Addiction and Dispossession along the Rio Grande
University of California Press, 2010
264 pp., US$ 28.95 (paperback)

In his sprawling and widely lauded novel Infinite Jest, the late David Foster Wallace offers a riveting portrait of modern addiction. Scenes of the banality of Twelve-Step programs drew on Wallace’s own experiences in …

Books

The Clinic (Inside Out): and (a series of) Elsewhere(s)

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The Clinic and Elsewhere: Addiction, Adolescents, and the Afterlife of Therapy

by Todd Meyers

University of Washington Press, 2013
172 pp, US$25.00 (paperback)

The Clinic and Elsewhere is an extremely well-crafted account of the methodological, conceptual and narrative problems of knowledge and life of the afterlife of drug therapy.  Todd Meyers gives expressive form to the attempt to cure, to …

Books

Kenneth MacLeish’s Making War at Fort Hood

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Making War at Fort Hood: Life and Uncertainty in a Military Community

by Kenneth T. MacLeish

Princeton University Press, 2013. 280 pp, US$ 29.95 (Cloth)

 

“They didn’t get into the details of real life, the little things,” a troubled U.S. war veteran criticizes a PTSD primer for returning soldiers in Kenneth MacLeish’s ethnography Making War at Fort Hood.  …

Books

Eduardo Kohn’s How Forests Think: Toward an Anthropology Beyond the Human

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Editor’s note: As part of our new series, Second Opinion (not to be confused with the SMA’s similarly titled newsletter) we ask two contributors to review the same book, respond to the same question, or comment on the same set of issues.  For our first pair of Second Opinion posts, we invited two reviews of Eduardo Kohn’s new book, How …