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Doing and Seeing: Cultivating a “Fractured Habitus” through Reflexive Clinician Ethnography

Introduction

The tension between critical theoretical innovation and on-the-ground, practical application has animated intense debate in medical anthropology (Scheper-Hughes 1990). Epistemological and methodological conflicts cropping up at the intersection of medicine and anthropology, though central considerations for all medical anthropologists, represent an inescapable source of tension for MD/PhD clinician-ethnographers. While innovative manuscripts produced by such scholars (Wendland 2019) have illustrated …

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The Thinness of Care: The Promise of Medical Anthropology in MD/PhD Training

In the mid-twentieth century, recognizing the growing need for innovations born of clinical experience, pathways for training MD-PhD physician-scientists emerged in the hopes that this hybrid training could produce novel insights into disease and ultimately, treatments. In the years since formal MD/PhD training programs were established, a growing number of institutions have established pathways for a combination with non-traditional disciplines, …

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Medical Anthropology and Practice of Medicine in Health Issues

Abstract: It is known through anthropological literature that African countries are distinguished by a category of medicine that many specialists call ethnomedicine or traditional African medicine. Faced with biomedicine, ethnomedicine has often been relegated to the background in the resolution of health-related problems. However, ethnomedicine resurfaces in African countries, particularly in Cameroon, when there is no biomedical solution to a

Lectures

Disrupting medical anthropology: Views from Kenya and Cameroon on how to build a more inclusive discipline

Medical anthropologists often strive to disrupt typical public health and medical discourses, in part by questioning the broader applicability of individualized psychological concepts and biomedical diagnoses outside of the small, privileged Western circles from which these constructs originate (Henrich et al. 2010). However, within our own discipline, access to theoretical innovations and conversations remain decidedly siloed and one-sided. Scholars have …

Lectures

Working in a Fracture Zone: Learning to Research Mental Health from Multiple Cultures

We are an ensemble cast. As such, it is perhaps appropriate that one of the first places where we all came together as a team had at one point been a set for a Canadian television show. Now the buildings are owned by the First Nations, an Anishinaabek community, with whom we were partnered. We came together through a series …

Lectures

Introduction: Working Definitions: Making and Unmaking “Medical Anthropology” around the World

Anthropology’s interest in health, illness, prevention, and treatment is longstanding and increasingly robust. In this era of medical development, epidemics and pandemics, and debates in both the oft-called “Global North” and “Global South” over anthropology, colonialism, and associated prefixes (post-, neo-, de-), the constellation of theory and praxis known as medical anthropology has traveled fast and far. In this Somatosphere