Features

The Limits of Rations and Cash for Food Programs: Food Related Illness in The Gihembe Refugee Camp

An elderly woman, whom I will call Mama Solange, walks the narrow, muddy pathway between her home and the neighbors compound in the refugee camp. She takes me for a humanitarian aid worker, or perhaps just for someone new to direct her complaints. Cupping maize in her outstretched hands, she looks at me, shakes her head silently and spits to …

BooksFeatures

Susan Reynolds Whyte’s Second Chances: Surviving AIDS in Uganda

second chances coverSecond Chances: Surviving AIDS in Uganda

Susan Reynolds Whyte, editor

Contributions by Godfrey Etyang, Phoebe Kajubi, David Kyaddondo, Lotte Meinert, Hanne Mogensen, Jenipher Twebaze, Michael A. Whyte

Duke University Press, 2014, 328 pages

 

What would happen if an entire generation of people who were expected to die experienced a ‘medical resurrection’?What would that generation do with their second …

Features

Post-Script, Still Longer Shadows: Guillaume Lachenal on “In the Shadow of Ebola”

This article is part of the series:

This commentary on Gregg Mitman and Sarita Siegel’s In the Shadow of Ebola is intended as a post-script to the forum on the film which appeared earlier this year. Lachenal prepared this text, written in Paris, for a special session of the African Studies Association meetings in San Diego on 20 November 2015.

The first time I saw the film, …

Features

Tu Youyou and the Nobel Prize

When I interviewed Professor Tu Youyou in 2005 — in her office at the Chinese Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine, the work unit within which she had spent her entire life after completing a doctorate in chemistry at Beida (the University of Beijing) — I did not expect her to receive any further awards, and certainly neither the Lasker nor …

Features

Film Forum — In the Shadow of Ebola

This article is part of the series: ,

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It was only a year ago that the Ebola epidemic in West Africa was highly visible. Images of health workers dressed in hot and heavy hazmat gear, body bags being tossed into shallow graves, and press conferences with top international health officials routinely peppered the nightly news cycle.

Perhaps you, like me, promptly added a week on the Ebola crisis …

Announcements

Limn issue no. 5: Ebola’s Ecologies

This article is part of the series:

FrontCover6-220x284We’d like to help spread the word about the recent issue of Limn, edited by Andrew Lakoff, Stephen J. Collier and Christopher Kelty, now in print.

From the editors:

“This issue of Limn on “Ebola’s Ecologies” examines how the 2014 Ebola outbreak has put the norms, practices, and institutional logics of global health into question, and examines the new assemblages …