Lectures

African Immigrant Care Workers & COVID in the US: Their Fears, Protections, and Recalibrations

This article is part of the series:

The US healthcare system depends on the labor of immigrant healthcare professionals, a fact mainly unrecognized and unreported during the pandemic. Twenty-eight percent of physicians are foreign-born, as are 22 percent of nursing assistants (Batalova 2020). The immigrant professionals make up even more of the workforce in healthcare positions that are undervalued, in comparison to what is considered skilled medical …

Lectures

Writing Life No. 3: An interview with Janelle Taylor

This article is part of the series:
Figure 1: Janelle’s chair, with writing and knitting projects underway

The conversation began on a summer day in a 13th Century chateau, with a moat, on the outskirts of Maastricht in the Netherlands. Janelle Taylor was leading a writing workshop with Jeremy Greene and Rachel Prentice, as part of a larger event for the ERC-funded project Making Clinical

Lectures

The Other Side of COVID-19: Ostracization and Guilt among Older Patients in India

This article is part of the series:
Neighbours together during the Autumnal festival (pre-COVID; Photo: A. Chatterjee

Anamika landed in Dubai on an October 2020 afternoon, and called her mother, Arpita, to let her know about her safe arrival.[1] Anamika’s brother, Mainak, resides in Pune. Arpita is 67 and her husband Manoshij is 77. Despite their old age, they preferred to live alone in Kolkata instead …

Lectures

Window Work: Framing Eldercare in the Age of COVID-19

This article is part of the series:

In this blogpost, we draw from our current fieldwork on the island of Ærø, a place which has branded itself as “the digital island”[1], to explore how care workers tinker with screens during the COVID-19 pandemic in order to care for the elderly from a distance.

A New Way of Seeing

Marie is a healthcare worker on the …

Books

Ageless: Reflections on Lawrence Cohen’s No Aging in India

This article is part of the series:

Two decades ago, Lawrence Cohen’s No Aging in India: Alzheimer’s, the Bad Family, and Other Modern Things challenged the ways in which we think about aging and senility, kinship and its undoing, medicine and the nation, language and the possibilities of ethnographic writing, and what it means to do the anthropology of South Asia. But its 300-odd pages contain much …

Lectures

‘Stolen Spring’: Danish elders in plejehjemem under COVID-19 visiting restrictions

This article is part of the series:

First published in 1940, Hans Scherfig’s The Stolen Spring (Det Forsømte Forår) is both a satirical crime novel and a wry social commentary. Through his description of a school’s sociocultural dynamics and how administrators handle the murder of a teacher, Scherfig pointedly criticises particular patterns and structures in Danish society. As one reviewer wrote: “The small, scared …