Books

How did we get here? A review of Yasmin Gunaratnam’s “Death and the Migrant: Bodies, Borders and Care”

death and the migrant cover

Death and the Migrant: Bodies, Borders and Care

by Yasmin Gunaratnam

Bloomsbury Publishing, 2013, 208 pages

 

David Tasma, a Polish Jew and survivor of the Warsaw ghetto, died in 1949 in the care of a British nurse, Cicely Saunders. The £500 he bequeathed to Saunders contributed to the founding of the St Christopher’s Hospice in Sydenham, an institution dedicated …

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Bianca Brijnath’s “Unforgotten: Love and the Culture of Dementia Care in India”

Brijnath

Unforgotten: Love and the Culture of Dementia Care in India

by Bianca Brijnath

Berghahn Books, 2014, 240 pages

Bianca Brijnath’s book, Unforgotten: Love and the Culture of Dementia Care in India, offers a long-awaited, fresh insight into the lives and experiences of people with dementia and their caregivers in middle-class, middle-aged, educated Delhi-based families. Using the lens of critical …

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Conference review: MAGic 2015 Anthropology and Global Health: Interrogating Theory, Policy and Practice

“Global Health is like a containership. The multiple actors —international and local NGOs, humanitarian organisations, scientists, activists, politicians — operate the tugboats, attempting to nudge, tug and pull the ship into its dock, where it will be offloaded and transported, i.e. implemented, by those who were able to demonstrate the greatest technical skill and advantage. […]As anthropologists, we must continue

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Cristiana Giordano’s Migrants in Translation

9780520276666Migrants in Translation: Caring and the Logics of Difference in Contemporary Italy

By Cristiana Giordano

University of California Press, 2014, 288 pages.

 

Exploring the political entailments of rehabilitating “victims of human trafficking” in Italy, Migrants in Translation speaks to the often puzzling disjuncture between recent anthropological and public discourses concerning migrant care and integration: while anthropology’s critiques have led, …

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Caring as existential insecurity: quarantine, care, and human insecurity in the Ebola crisis

This article is part of the series:

In August of this year, when the Ebola outbreak escalated in Liberia and a state of emergency had been declared for the country, Fatu Kekula, a young Liberian nursing student, improvised personal protective equipment (PPE) to care for her father, mother, sister, and cousin. After three of the relatives survived, her method was featured prominently in the international news media …