Features

Texting Like A State: mHealth and the first thousand days in South Africa

This article is part of the series:

What does making a new life look like from the perspective of a mobile phone?

For the phone of a woman using the public health care system in Cape Town, South Africa, in all likelihood involves a series of WhatsApp conversations with a partner, with friends and kin. The phone helps with “Googling” questions about health and childcare, maybe about …

Features

Beyond “Banned Words”: The CDC, Trump’s Anti-Science, and Anthropological Outrage

This article is part of the series:

I am delighted that anthropologists joined the debate unleashed by a story published in the Washington Post on 15 December 2017, in which health reporter Lena Sun and politics correspondent Juliet Eilperin suggested that “The Trump administration is prohibiting officials at the nation’s top public health agency from using a list of seven words or phrases … in official documents …

Features

What’s At Stake in Speculation?

This article is part of the series:

We’ve long been thinking about health, well-being, illness, sickness, and disease, in relation to risk. That things might not be maintained at their present levels, either individually, among our cared-for, or socially, is not something new, even if we’ve entered a period of intensification, with calls to ‘repeal and replace’ the Affordable Care Act, and the slow, often subtle chipping …

Books

Brian Massumi’s “What Animals Teach Us About Politics”

massumi-animals

What Animals Teach Us About Politics

by Brian Massumi

Duke University Press, 2014, 152 pages.

This is a book about choice. That reader who chooses non-acquiescence, chooses learning and living, who is willing to abduct one’s self from home (63) and be self-surpassing, that is the reader Brian Massumi addresses himself to. The one who, instead, seeks comfort in repeating …