Lectures

Caring for home: The failures of vaccine nationalism, or, Why the pandemic will not be over soon

This article is part of the series:

Para español aquí.

It was one of those early spring evenings where the sun was warm and the air fresh. My friends and I were at the park, in what has become a pandemic ritual. Seeing people of all ages running, reading, talking, walking their pets, and enjoying themselves while we also traded the confines of our small apartments for …

Lectures

Visions of Black Futurity Amidst the Double Pandemic of COVID-19 and Police Brutality

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When I ask Willow, an Afro-Puerto Rican young woman in her 20s, if quarantine has helped reduce the stigma of mental illness, she responds:

I think it will because now we have something to compare it to. When we’re talking about having a hard time or feelings of not being able to escape ourselves, we can say, “Well, how was

Lectures

Thinking through the ‘Biosocial’: Rhythmic Reflections in Pandemic Times

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Much has been written of late on the ‘biosocial’ in the social sciences and humanities — see for example Ingold (2013), Meloni et al (2016), Lloyd and Muller (2018) — including postings in Somatosphere (Béhague 2020Meloni 2014). In part this stems from the limits of ‘representational’ approaches and a need to marry the biological and social …

Lectures

Solidarity, infrastructure and critical pedagogy during COVID-19: Lessons from Brazil

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Even before the pandemic hit Brazil’s favelas, residents began organizing to protect themselves — against both the novel coronavirus and the government’s active suppression of effective public health action (Ortega and Orsini, 2020). Seasoned activists began fund-raising, mobilizations donations, distributing food, masks, and hygiene kits, and writing policies and manifestos; volunteers signed up to learn basic first aid and walk …

Lectures

On the Search for the Origins of COVID-19: A Forum

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More than a year into the COVID-19 pandemic, the origin of the virus causing the disease remains uncertain. The predominant theory is that its emergence in human populations was the result of zoonotic transmission, via an as-yet to be determined animal host. A competing (if still marginal) theory holds that a more likely source of the initial outbreak was an …

Lectures

Chronic living: ethnographic explorations of daily lives swayed by (multiple) medical conditions

This article is part of the series:

On the 12th of January 2020, the World Health Organization confirmed that the “mystery virus” which, according to reports from China, had infected some 50 people in the city of Wuhan, was not SARS following the genetic sequencing of a “novel coronavirus”. Within two weeks, Wuhan’s hospitals were overwhelmed, and the city was sent into lockdown as health authorities …