Lectures

Thinking Sex in Times of Corona: A Conversation

This article is part of the series:

Over 30 years ago, Gayle Rubin argued in her seminal piece – “Thinking Sex” – that “sexuality should be treated with special respect in times of great social stress” (1984, 143). The Sars-CoV 19 pandemic raises new questions about how we engage with one another, with sex becoming a sensitive issue once again. How can one address the issue of …

Lectures

“Out of options”: The implications of COVID-19 for hospitalized patients with cognitive impairment

This article is part of the series:

“How about a walk today?” I asked Mr. T each morning I arrived to the hospital, visiting him on my morning rounds. Mr T. grinned back at me from the edge of his bed beneath his bright red veteran’s baseball cap, a sharp contrast to the dull monotone hospital gown. “Oh you betcha, doc,” he smiled. Our daily stroll entailed …

Lectures

COVID-19 and The Lessons Anthropology Learned from HIV/AIDS

This article is part of the series:

On April 24, 1980, Ken Horne, a San Francisco resident, was reported to the Center for Disease Control (CDC) as a young man suffering with an old man’s disease, Kaposi’s sarcoma. Subsequently, in 1981, the CDC identified Horne as the first patient in the US of what would (in 1982) come to be called AIDS. By June 5, 1981, a …

Lectures

A Virus Podcast Goes Viral

This article is part of the series:

In the early days of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, a relatively obscure virology podcast called “This Week in Virology” suddenly became wildly popular. Seemingly overnight, the show suddenly gained tens of thousands of new listeners. Listeners from all walks of life — from postal workers to police officers to English teachers — were writing in with all sorts of …

Lectures

COVID-19 and the extraordinary normality of the War on Drugs

This article is part of the series:

As if it were not challenging enough during the “normal emergencies” [1] of the United States-led War on Drugs, research and advocacy for sane drug policies becomes even more complicated during a global pandemic.

COVID-19 has exposed the deep and enduring health and social inequities that mark our biopolitical moment, and the punitive ways that we govern people who use …

Lectures

The metropolis and mental life in the age of COVID-19: Delaying descent into the blasé attitude

This article is part of the series:

The COVID city: Class, physical isolation, and virtual connection

At the time of writing this we are all experiencing what the classical sociologist Émile Durkheim would call a “social fact” — something that cuts across all individuals and exerts social control on each of us. Today this solidarity-in-separation encompasses almost the whole world (Davies 2019). We are also enduring a …