Lectures

In and outside the nursing home: On the (im)possibilities of meaningful contact while being held apart

This article is part of the series:

Ben (77) wrote this poem when he became unable to visit his wife Lise in the nursing home where she lived, expressing the loss and desperation of suddenly and indefinitely being held apart. As part of the measures taken in the Netherlands to prevent the spread of COVID-19, a visit ban had been imposed on nursing homes. Apart from staff, …

Lectures

How is the pandemic affecting people with dementia? A case study

This article is part of the series:

Our team is completing a rapid appraisal study of the perceptions of frontline long-term care (LTC) workers in a southern state about care during the COVID-19 pandemic. One specific area of heightened concern is caring for people with dementia in congregate facilities during this global health crisis. Person-centered care for people with ADRD (Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias) is based on the …

Lectures

“Out of options”: The implications of COVID-19 for hospitalized patients with cognitive impairment

This article is part of the series:

“How about a walk today?” I asked Mr. T each morning I arrived to the hospital, visiting him on my morning rounds. Mr T. grinned back at me from the edge of his bed beneath his bright red veteran’s baseball cap, a sharp contrast to the dull monotone hospital gown. “Oh you betcha, doc,” he smiled. Our daily stroll entailed …

Lectures

Of dogs and their humans: Late life in a more-than-human world of the COVID-19 pandemic

This article is part of the series:

Sometimes when we go to the park, Bruce – my canine research assistant – and I meet with another more-than-human pair, who join us for a game of fetch. The other pair, both human and dog, are quite old and slow, and pace to each other’s rhythm in a way that only partners who have lived together for a long …

Lectures

A Poetics of Dementia

One rainy morning in November, I called my mother.

“Hi mum, how’re you doing?”
“Well, it isn’t much fun to be sitting here in a chicken run all day long. They’ve even stretched the mesh right along the sideboard.”

I picture my mother, who had been immobile for years, seated in her blue-painted wicker chair next to the window. Within …

Features

Suffering, Agency, and the Value of Early and Late Life

‘Do no harm’ is the first principle in both research ethics and bioethics, conveying an inherent ambiguity in the biomedical imperative to create healthier and longer human lives. As such, both medical intervention and research have always straddled the delicate border between care and violence, exposing how doing good can be easily transformed into or confused with doing harm. This …