Web Roundups

Web Roundup: Death, Life, and the Immortal Brain

Among the many tech-focused booths at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) early this year, one stood out in particular: an exhibition of manufactured bodies, or “sleeves,” into which someone could theoretically download their consciousness. The exhibition was a promotion for the new Netflix series Altered Carbon, a science fiction saga set 300 years in the future where individuals can …

BooksFeatures

Book Forum: Larisa Jašarević’s Health and Wealth on the Bosnian Market

This article is part of the series:

 

In Health and Wealth on the Bosnian Market: An Intimate Debt, Larisa Jašarević explores the mutual entanglement between the economy, living body and the good life in postsocialist and postwar Bosnia. Beautifully written and theoretically sophisticated, this ethnography is a key addition to scholarly literature on debt, moral economies, medical anthropology, and material bodies. We are pleased to …

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Beauty

In the late 1990s, a group of Japanese researchers set out to investigate whether small-scale gold mining operations near the shores of East Africa’s Lake Victoria were resulting in mercury contamination of local fish and human populations. The group included Dr. Masazumi Harada who began his medical career in the early 1960s by studying the devastating effects of severe mercury …

Books

Book forum: Emilia Sanabria’s Plastic Bodies: Sex Hormones and Menstrual Suppression in Brazil

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We are very pleased to bring you a set of thoughtful engagements with Emilia Sanabria’s remarkable book, Plastic Bodies: Sex Hormones and Menstrual Suppression in Brazil (Duke University Press, 2016).  As you’ll see from the commentaries, Plastic Bodies is already well on its way to becoming a touchstone in the medical anthropology and STS literatures on gender, bodies, and pharmaceuticals.…

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Beauty’s Knowledge: Hawthorne’s Moral Fable “Rappaccini’s Daughter”

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Nathaniel Hawthorne’s story “Rappaccini’s Daughter” is a nineteenth-century moral fable that sets the fruits of experimental knowledge against obligations to humanity, and stages a dramatic encounter between these two apparent goods. In many ways, the moral it offers seems familiar, and could be recognized by anyone with even a passing familiarity with contemporary bioethical debates. It features a mad scientist’s …

BooksFeatures

Top of the Heap: Zoë H. Wool

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For this installment of the Top of the Heap series, I spoke with Zoë H. Wool, who is a medical anthropologist and assistant professor at Rice University in Texas.

The invitation to contribute to the Top of the Heap felt like such a treat…and then sent me into a tailspin of professional anxiety (Alexander I. Stingl laid out the dilemma …