FeaturesLectures

Writing Life No. 5: An interview with Robert Desjarlais

This article is part of the series:
Photo by Robert Desjarlais

“British poet W.H Auden suggested that true poets are those who like ‘hanging around words listening to what they say.”

Desjarlais, 2011, Counterplay: An Anthropologist at the Chess Board,15.

At the Paris Institute of Advanced Studies, where Robert is currently a research fellow, it is 3:30 p.m. We meet online to discuss how to …

Lectures

Writing Life No. 4: An interview with Tom Rice

This article is part of the series:
Figure 1: One of Tom’s writing space, Exeter, UK

“An acoustemologist, that’s probably the best professional description for me” – Tom Rice is a Senior Lecturer at the Department of Sociology, Philosophy and Anthropology at the University of Exeter, with a research focus on the anthropology of sound. Ever since childhood, sound has been important to him, but working as …

Lectures

Writing Life No. 2: An interview with Adia Benton

This article is part of the series:
Figure 1: Adia’s writing space

“A special thanks to all the elders who ever told me to learn to be still. Research need not be running around in an effort to apprehend information. It can sometimes be accomplished by being still and comprehending. By climbing into my chair and working, a lot of things came my way via the phone,

Lectures

Writing Life No. 1: An interview with Rachel Prentice

This article is part of the series:
Figure 1: Rachel’s writing space with friend Jasper (2007-2019)
(Photograph by Rachel Prentice)

Rachel E. Prentice is a no muss, no fuss anthropologist of medicine, technology, and the body and currently an associate professor in the Department of Science and Technology Studies at Cornell University. What follows is a shortened and edited compilation of her prompted musings on …

Lectures

Reworking the Cognitive Bias – a Brainstorm

This article is part of the series:

Can we change the way that we think about thinking? Can we rework our thoughts about thought? If so, what would reworking thought open up, analytically and ethnographically? Those were the provocations we started with, an invitation to draw together early career researchers working on diverse ways of conceptualizing thinking and not-thinking, cognizing and not-cognizing. 

Even asking these questions raises …

BooksLectures

Katie Kilroy-Marac’s An Impossible Inheritance: Postcolonial Psychiatry and the Work of Memory in a West African Clinic

An Impossible Inheritance: Postcolonial Psychiatry and the Work of Memory in a West African Clinic

Katie Kilroy-Marac

University of California Press, 2019. 288 pages.

Katie Kilroy-Marac begins An Impossible Inheritance with a curious epigraph: “The individual can be said to be ‘tangled up in stories’ which happen to him before any story is recounted.”[1] This statement from Paul Ricoeur’s …