Features

Post-Script, Still Longer Shadows: Guillaume Lachenal on “In the Shadow of Ebola”

This article is part of the series:

This commentary on Gregg Mitman and Sarita Siegel’s In the Shadow of Ebola is intended as a post-script to the forum on the film which appeared earlier this year. Lachenal prepared this text, written in Paris, for a special session of the African Studies Association meetings in San Diego on 20 November 2015.

The first time I saw the film, …

Features

Swamp Dialogues: Filming Ethnography

In recent anthropological film practice we see a shift from established visual ethnographic paradigms focused on discursive representation (Crawford 1992), towards the realm of interdisciplinary cooperation and experimentation. Working with filmmakers and artists has a long history in visual anthropology, however recent theoretical debates open up new terrains for cooperation with various fields like science and technology studies, bio-medical sciences, …

Books

Book review: Transcultural Montage

Transcultural Montage

Christian Suhr and Rane Willerslev, editors

Afterword by George E. Marcus

Berghahn Books, 2013. 300 pp.

 

Transcultural Montage contains an abundance of fresh ideas in many sub-disciplines of anthropology such as medical anthropology, cognitive anthropology, cultural and economic anthropology, but also semantics, museology and knowledge production not to mention visual anthropology, the main sub-discipline to which …

Features

Why I Make Ethnographic Films (Instead of Writing a Monograph…)

This post is largely unaltered from its original form on the new blog Psychocultural Cinema, which focuses on the intersection of medical and psychological anthropology with ethnographic and documentary filmmaking.

Orwell was once asked by his editor to address the question “why I write.” Orwell, in his typically clear and direct manner, listed a range of reasons, from personal …

Features

A Conversation with Karen Nakamura

[This article is being cross-posted at the blogs of the Foundation for Psychocultural Research (FPR) and the FPR-UCLA Center for Culture, Brain, Development and Mental Health (CBDMH). Thanks to the FPR’s Constance Cummings for sharing this post with Somatosphere].

Science writer Karen A. Frenkel interviews anthropologist Karen Nakamura for the FPR.

 

Karen Nakamura is Associate Professor of Anthropology and

FeaturesTeaching Resources

Educational Video Database on Genetic/Reproductive Technologies & Social Issues

While a wealth of literature exists on emerging reproductive and genetic technologies, usable educational resources in other mediums are few and far between.  A new series of videos helps to fill this lacuna, providing engaging, accessible and thought-provoking commentary on the human aspects of biotechnology, science, and medical practice.

The videos feature commentary, remarks, and reflections from over 50 esteemed …