Lectures

Women, gender and viruses: coronas and microscopes in the time of a pandemic

This article is part of the series:

Among the multitude of narratives prompted by the current pandemic, the biography of June Dalziel Hart Almeida has been circulated by the BBC and other periodicals in numerous languages. Through the Internet’s power to feed the voracious desire and need to produce and consume information about the infection and microorganism involved, this woman virologist has achieved heroine status. It was …

Web Roundups

Web Roundup: Covid-19, Racial Justice, Immigration, Climate Justice, Reproductive Justice, or “How All Politics Became Reproductive Politics”

As I was thinking about the task of reviewing the anthropological, bioethical, and/or STS implications of the past month of news, my mind kept returning to the introduction of Laura Briggs’ recent book How All Politics Became Reproductive Politics: From Welfare Reform to Foreclosure to Trump. In Briggs’ introduction, she finds “reproductive labor” is necessary to both biological reproduction …

Lectures

Who Should Be Concerned? Zika as an Epidemic About Mosquitoes and Women (and some reflections on COVID-19)

This article is part of the series:

For English click here.

Quem deve se preocupar? Zika como uma Epidemia de Mosquitos e Mulheres (e algumas reflexões sobre o COVID-19)

A nova epidemia de coronavírus está em todas as manchetes; o número de pessoas infectadas e de fatalidades aumentando em todo o mundo. Quando os primeiros casos apareceram nos Estados Unidos, notícias da mídia e até algumas …

Lectures

Reproductive rights in the time of COVID-19

This article is part of the series:

As the global pandemic escalates, health services are rapidly changing, creating tension between reproductive rights and safeguarding against COVID-19 spread, revealing the question: what is essential and what is not?

As the world grapples with the growing threat of COVID-19, health systems are being put to the test, rushing to radically reconfigure themselves in time to absorb a large influx …

Lectures

homunculus Revolts: Re-Figuring the Neurological Subject

Figuring a Grotesque Norm

 1954 Homunculus: Penfield Archives, Osler Library of the History of Medicine
 This hand drawn illustration rendered in black ink shows two mirror image outlines of cross sections of the cerebral cortex comprised of segmented lines each of which is labeled with the part of the body to which that part of the brain corresponds. Curving around the surface of each outline are the sensory (on the left) and motor (on the right) homunculi, distorted nude human figures with elongated feet, massive hands, massive faces with huge lips and mouth separated from their bodies, and various parts of the alimentary system represented below the chin. The sensory homunculus also has a scrotum and uncircumcised penis beneath its feet. The heads of each seem to have shorn hair, and musculature and features coded as male. 1954 Homunculus: Penfield Archives, Osler Library of the History of Medicine
This hand drawn illustration rendered in black ink shows two mirror image outlines of cross sections of the cerebral cortex comprised of segmented lines each of which is labeled with the part of the body to which that part of the brain corresponds. Curving around
Web Roundups

Web Roundup: Beyond Using More Female Rats: Gender Disparities in Biomedicine

Recently, physicians, public health experts, and anthropologists (among others) have pointed to a prevalence of gender, class, race, age, and ethnic bias in biomedical research and the specific ways in which knowledges about bodies are created and reproduced in biomedicine.

In the 19th century, when the long-standing idea of women’s inferiority was brought into question more …