Web Roundups

Web Roundup: CRISPR Babies and Bioethics

In late November, He Jiankui, a scientist in China, announced that he had created the first “CRISPR babies,” meaning that he performed germ-line genome edits on human embryos, which were implanted through in vitro fertilization (IVF), and has now resulted the birth of twin girls. He used CRISPR-Cas9, a genome editing technology that can target DNA at precise

Books

Osagie Obasogie and Marcy Darnovsky’s Beyond Bioethics: Toward a New Biopolitics

Beyond Bioethics: Toward a New Biopolitics

Osagie K. Obasogie and Marcy Darnovsky (editors)

University of California Press, 2018. 518 pages

 

The science will let loose its cascading interactions with utter impassivity; yet how we inhabit that knowledge will be a contest of the imagination, a sedimentation of political futures, a constructed infinity of worlds.” —Patricia J. Williams

 …

Books

Nadine Ehlers and Leslie R. Hinkson’s Subprime Health: Debt and Race in US Medicine

Subprime Health: Debt and Race in US Medicine

Nadine Ehlers and Leslie R. Hinkson (editors)

University of Minnesota Press, 2017. 256 pages

 

“The focus on race in medicine and the hard sciences,” write Nadine Ehlers and Leslie R. Hinkson in their introduction to the new edited volume Subprime Health: Debt and Race in US Medicine, “creates unintended consequences—forms …

Books

After and Beyond the Genome: Taking Postgenomics Seriously

The Postgenomic Condition: Ethics, Justice, and Knowledge after the Genome

Jenny Reardon

University of Chicago Press, 2017, 304 pages.

 

Genetics: A Situated View      

How enduring is the love affair between our societies and genetics (today genomics)? And what is the role of critical social science in undermining or, rather, mirroring the power of this romance? And what do we

Features

Splice of Life

A Birthday Present

Georgia, my middle daughter of three, is a combination of my DNA and identity release[1] donor #2817[2]. Unlike her sisters who both have the advantage of knowing their sperm donors in real time (both friends of mine), Georgia’s donor can only be revealed to her next year when she turns 18. There is a …

Features

Risk and utility in the governance of diagnostic testing: the case of genetic screening, 1960 to the present

This article is part of the series:

Routine collection of blood samples from neonates – often using so-called Guthrie cards (pictured) – began in the 1960s when a number of North American and European countries set up screening programmes for phenylketonuria, a rare single-gene disorder which leads to developmental delays and early death if untreated. Such programmes have since been introduced in many other countries around the …