Web Roundups

Web Roundup: Ebola 3: Epidemic, Endemic, Continuation as Aftermath?

This article is part of the series:

Now that the crisis has waned, will we continue to discuss Ebola as a persistent threat? Or will we let ourselves forget, right up until the next terrifying epidemic?

The process of rebuilding lives and social systems after Ebola is in progress (see NPR’s multimedia presentation “Life After Death“). The possibility that Ebola will become endemic – …

Books

Guillaume Lachenal’s Le médicament qui devait sauver l’Afrique

This article is part of the series:

Lachenal - Cover

Le médicament qui devait sauver l’Afrique

by Guillaume Lachenal

La Découverte, 2014, 250 pages.

 

Guillaume Lachenal’s Le médicament qui devait sauver l’Afrique – the English-language title provided by the publishing house is The hidden history of the medicine meant to save Africa – is devoted to a pharmaceutical scandal in colonial Africa that remains absent from the official history. …

Books

Erin Koch’s Free Market Tuberculosis

Koch - CoverFree Market Tuberculosis: Managing Epidemics in Post-Soviet Georgia

by Erin Koch

2013, Vanderbilt University Press, 240 pages

 

Erin Koch’s Free Market Tuberculosis: Managing Epidemics in Post-Soviet Georgia (2013) provides an engaging and conceptually stimulating portrayal of the transition, in the late 20th and early 21st century, from Georgia’s Soviet style of tuberculosis (TB) care to globalized and neoliberalized …

Books

Ian Harper’s Development and Public Health in the Himalaya

Harper - Cover

Ian Harper, Professor of Anthropology, Health, and Development at the University of Edinburgh, talks to Alice Street about his book Development and Public Health in the Himalaya: Reflections on Healing in Contemporary Nepal.

 

AS: Ian, maybe you can tell us a little bit about your history as a medical practitioner, and how you came to work in Nepal.

IH: …

Features

Rethinking Infrastructures for Global Health: A View from West Africa and Papua New Guinea

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Medicines“Without staff, stuff, space and systems, nothing can be done”. Paul Farmer’s reflections on his recent trip to Liberia in The London Review of Books reiterated in stark terms what health experts have been saying for months. There is by now a fairly clear consensus in the global health community that the uncontrolled spread of Ebola in West Africa …

Features

Caring as existential insecurity: quarantine, care, and human insecurity in the Ebola crisis

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In August of this year, when the Ebola outbreak escalated in Liberia and a state of emergency had been declared for the country, Fatu Kekula, a young Liberian nursing student, improvised personal protective equipment (PPE) to care for her father, mother, sister, and cousin. After three of the relatives survived, her method was featured prominently in the international news media …