In the Journals

HIV Scale-Up and the Politics of Global Health — A Special Issue of Global Public Health

A recent issue of the journal Global Public Health was a notable double special issue on “HIV Scale-Up and the Politics of Global Health,” edited by Nora J. Kenworthy and Richard Parker. As the editors write in their introduction:

[W]e embark on this special issue at a particular disjuncture in the history of the epidemic. Just over

Features

Research at the medico-legal borderland: perspectives on HIV and criminal law

This article is part of the series:

In recent years, the criminalization of HIV transmission, exposure and non-disclosure has become a hot topic among those working within the global AIDS milieu.  Social scientists have become increasingly attentive to the complex and varied consequences and impacts of HIV criminalization. Not surprisingly, at this year’s Association of the Social Science and Humanities on HIV (ASSHH) Conference there was a …

FeaturesTeaching Resources

The Afflictions Series: an Interview with Ethnographic Filmmaker Robert Lemelson

When Robert Lemelson, an anthropologist, filmmaker, and research professor at UCLA, recently visited the George Washington University to speak at a conference on how ethnographic films can help us understand torture, I had to request an interview. I confess—I have long been a fan of Lemelson’s films, which I have seen screened at meetings as large as those …

Web Roundups

Web Roundup: Technology and storytelling

Inspired by last month’s post, I decided to format this post loosely around the theme of storytelling. Storytelling is fundamental to many of our lives, both academic and otherwise, and numerous new formats for telling, collecting, and archiving stories are cropping up. This post focuses on the ways in which technology is shaping and changing the kinds of stories we …

Features

Kin Porn

Drive by the building. Roll down the window. Look in the opposite direction. Chat with the driver. Shoot. Several times. Keep looking elsewhere. Hide the camera under your legs. Close the window.

I took this picture of the Institut d’Enseignement Médical (IEM, Institute of Medical Education) in December 2007 in Kasa-Vubu, Kinshasa. The IEM was designed in the late fifties …

Features

The archaeology of past futures, or fieldwork by fragments

This series is an exercise in fieldwork through material fragments – of coming to grips with the present pasts of scientific institutions in the ‘tropics’. It is about what biomedicine leaves behind – rusted instruments, congealed and unlabeled bloods slides – and the losses, pleasures, failures, and desires these leftovers relay. It is about photographs, blueprints, monuments and archives – …