Features

Conference review: MAGic 2015 Anthropology and Global Health: Interrogating Theory, Policy and Practice

“Global Health is like a containership. The multiple actors —international and local NGOs, humanitarian organisations, scientists, activists, politicians — operate the tugboats, attempting to nudge, tug and pull the ship into its dock, where it will be offloaded and transported, i.e. implemented, by those who were able to demonstrate the greatest technical skill and advantage. […]As anthropologists, we must continue

Web Roundups

Web Roundup: A busy month for Pharma…

This month it was hard not to pay attention to what was happening in the world of Pharma, where several cases came to light illustrating just how murky and contested the role of one of the most powerful industries in the world is in shaping not just business practices, but collective social and moral consciousness as well.

A recent Gallup

BooksFeatures

Book Forum — The Viral Network: A Pathography of the H1N1 Influenza Pandemic

This article is part of the series:

Viral Network

 

In this Book Forum, our commentators respond to Theresa MacPhail’s provocative ethnography of influenza research and public health response, The Viral Network: A Pathography of the H1N1 Influenza Epidemic.  Lyle Fearnley, Katherine A. Mason, Natalie Porter, Adia Benton, and Carlo Caduff reflect on — among other issues — the place and privileging of the laboratory, the simultaneously limiting …

Features

Film Forum — In the Shadow of Ebola

This article is part of the series: ,

TitleImage

It was only a year ago that the Ebola epidemic in West Africa was highly visible. Images of health workers dressed in hot and heavy hazmat gear, body bags being tossed into shallow graves, and press conferences with top international health officials routinely peppered the nightly news cycle.

Perhaps you, like me, promptly added a week on the Ebola crisis …

BooksFeatures

Book Forum — Christian McMillen’s “Discovering Tuberculosis”

This article is part of the series:

9780300190298

 

Christian McMillen’s Discovering Tuberculosis is many things, but mostly it is an account of failure.  The book is a story of disease control in the twentieth century that is anything but controlled.  McMillen gives needed attention to problems of the past that find themselves – unexpectedly, dangerously – occupying our present moment (though it should be made clear from …