FeaturesLectures

Provincializing Metabolism (On the Poverty of Modernism)

According to accepted wisdom and textbooks, “metabolism” is a nineteenth-century term and concept, established at the confluence of organic chemistry, cell biology, and physiology. In Microscopical Researches (1839), Schwann spoke of the “metabolic phenomena of the cells,” using for the first time the adjective metabolische, from which “metabolic” entered the English language in the 1847 translation (Bing 1971). This standard …

Lectures

From women to women: building the state response to the Zika epidemic in Brazil

This article is part of the series:

For English, click here.

De mulher para mulher: construindo a resposta do estado à epidemia de Zika no Brasil

‘Minha vida era uma antes e outra depois da Zika’, disse Dra. Celina Turchi em uma conferência em Recife. Ela liderava o grupo que comprovou a relação causal entre o vírus da Zika e o aumento dos casos de microcefalia …

Lectures

Histórias of Zika

This article is part of the series:

For English click here.

Era o ano de 1947. Em uma floresta chamada Zika, em Uganda, liderados pelo médico-entomologista escocês Alexander J. Haddow, pesquisadores colocaram macacos-rhesus em plataformas de madeira no topo de árvores. Esses animais  estavam ali como “dispositivos sentinelas” (Keck e Lakoff 2013), seus corpos estavam destinados a detectar patógenos transmitidos pela picada de insetos. Um dia, verificou-se …

Books

Clapperton Chakanetsa Mavhunga’s The Mobile Workshop: The Tsetse Fly and African Knowledge Production

The Mobile Workshop: The Tsetse Fly and African Knowledge Production.

Clapperton Chakanetsa Mavhunga  

MIT Press, 2018. 412 pages.

Clapperton Chakanetsa Mavhunga’s latest book, The Mobile Workshop,is a historical examination of attempts to control the mobilities of the tsetse fly in Zimbabwe (formerly Southern Rhodesia, then Rhodesia). It is also an experiment in writing – hence, a ‘workshop’ – …

Books

Rohan Deb Roy’s Malarial Subjects: Empire, Medicine and Nonhumans in British India, 1820–1909

Malarial Subjects: Empire, Medicine and Nonhumans in British India, 1820–1909. (Open Access).

Rohan Deb Roy

Cambridge University Press, 2017. 332 pages.

Malaria has long garnered no shortage of interest among global health experts and the medical anthropologists periodically at their sides. The sustained concern owes in one part to the fact that malaria remains a major threat, and in …

Lectures

homunculus Revolts: Re-Figuring the Neurological Subject

Figuring a Grotesque Norm

 1954 Homunculus: Penfield Archives, Osler Library of the History of Medicine
 This hand drawn illustration rendered in black ink shows two mirror image outlines of cross sections of the cerebral cortex comprised of segmented lines each of which is labeled with the part of the body to which that part of the brain corresponds. Curving around the surface of each outline are the sensory (on the left) and motor (on the right) homunculi, distorted nude human figures with elongated feet, massive hands, massive faces with huge lips and mouth separated from their bodies, and various parts of the alimentary system represented below the chin. The sensory homunculus also has a scrotum and uncircumcised penis beneath its feet. The heads of each seem to have shorn hair, and musculature and features coded as male. 1954 Homunculus: Penfield Archives, Osler Library of the History of Medicine
This hand drawn illustration rendered in black ink shows two mirror image outlines of cross sections of the cerebral cortex comprised of segmented lines each of which is labeled with the part of the body to which that part of the brain corresponds. Curving around