Features

“Zero infections. Zero deaths. Zero stigma.”

This article is part of the series:

The UNAIDS mission of “Getting to Zero” is supported by three key goals: “Zero infections. Zero deaths. Zero stigma.” By taking up this mission, the San Francisco Department of Public Health (DPH) increased its dedication to ending the epidemic. DPH aims to realize these goals by expanding access to PrEP, ensuring RAPID (Rapid ART Program for HIV Diagnoses) linkage to …

Features

A ‘Critically Applied’ Approach to PrEP: Introduction

This article is part of the series:

This series has two aims. The first is to deepen anthropological engagement with a novel biomedical technology to prevent HIV. The second is to help bridge the divide between ‘critical’ and ‘applied’ approaches in our discipline. Over the following months we will publish a series of articles that work toward these joint goals. To introduce this series I begin with …

Features

Scholarly Stretching and Meta-Ethnography in the Medico-Legal Borderlands

This article is part of the series:

We met some years back at a scholarly conference where we were both presenting papers on a common theme: health care in the service of the law. We bonded over our shared academic interest in Stefan Timmermans and Jonathan Gabe’s (2002) “medico-legal borderlands” framework. As we came to realize, our research agendas were both conceptually situated within ‘borderland’ spaces. We …

Features

Why we must go beyond focusing on the ‘overrepresentation’ of racialized people in HIV criminalization

This article is part of the series:



We can trace an unbroken record of injustice back through generations, to our grandfathers and our grandmothers, our great-grandfathers and to those before them. We can trace them back to the time when a label was put on our people, legitimate victim. Other people learned that they could victimize us and nothing would happen because the laws, your laws, did

Books

Patient Zero and the Making of a Myth: History as an Archaeology of the Present

Patient Zero and the Making of the AIDS Epidemic

Richard A. McKay

University of Chicago Press, 2017, 400 pages

 

“An innocent he was not. He eventually told health investigators that during the 1970s he’d had some 2,500 sexual contacts with men in Europe, Canada, South America – and in the large centers of gay lifestyle in New York and California.

Features

Book Forum – Hervé Guibert’s Cytomegalovirus: A Hospitalization Diary

This article is part of the series:
436-cancelliere-2700x1800

A quarter-century after it was written, Hervé Guibert’s Cytomegalovirus reads both as a vital document of a particular moment in the history of the HIV/AIDS epidemic and as a wonderfully spare account of the banal humiliations and little triumphs of hospitalization in the shadow of a then-terminal illness.  Republished with a luminous Introduction by David Caron and a wide-ranging and