Books

Top of the heap: Martyn Pickersgill

This article is part of the series:

This week Martyn Pickersgill of the University of Edinburgh speaks to “Top of the heap” about some recent books on humanitarianism, pharmaceuticals, dementia and expertise.

Martyn Pickersgill

Amongst other bits and pieces, I currently have two large projects on the go: one, on access to therapy in mental health, and the other, on neuroscience and family life. With regards to …

Features

Longing for Sleep: Assessing the Place of Sleep in the 21st Century – Part 2

This article is part of the series:

Sleep has been in the news for the past decade or so as a matter of growing concern. Along with this popular, medical and scientific attention, social scientists have been increasingly interested in sleep as an object or process of study. The first major sociological book published on sleep was Simon Williams’ Sleep and Society (Routledge, 2005), after which

Web Roundups

Web Roundup: Dr. Jim Yong Kim at the World Bank, and, Dr. Robert Spitzer’s revocation

In the spirit of the web round-up series, this post gathers links to news stories and timely events of interest to the Somatosphere community that have appeared lately in the popular press and in medical anthropology circles. This month, the spotlight falls on two conversations, which will be treated separately: (1) the on-going conversation about ethics and humanitarianism, highlighted by …

Books

Book Review: Erica James’ Democratic Insecurities: Violence, Trauma, and Intervention in Haiti

Erica James. Democratic Insecurities: Violence, Trauma, and Intervention in Haiti.

Berkeley: University of California Press, 2010. 384 pages; $24.95

Review by Hanna Kienzler (McGill University)

“Supported by a rich cultural heritage, the Haitian people retain a capacity for hope, faith, and resilience that remains a tremendous resource for any efforts to rehabilitate the nation and its people” …

Features

Humanity: a new journal

Humanity is a new periodical published by the University of Pennsylvania Press, which describes itself as an “international journal of human rights, humanitarianism and development.”  These topics have been a central interest for many anthropologists of late and indeed anthropology is well represented among the members of the editorial collective and contributors to the journal’s first issue.  Here’s how …