Web Roundups

Web Roundup: Hurricane “relief” and Marijuana legalization

This month’s web roundup highlights two issues that have been in the news this November: Hurricane Sandy relief, and marijuana legalization. Both topics offer resonances with medical anthropology. At the end of the post, you’ll also find a list of articles on broader topics of interest to Somatosphere readers. Happy thanksgiving travel reading, everyone!

 

Hurricane Sandy relief

The concept …

Web Roundups

Transcriptions – Broadsheets – After AIDS 2012

Tracking AIDS Conference 2012

“Overwhelming” was the common descriptor for AIDS 2012 from delegates who I encountered, as well as those reflecting upon the conference on-line.  With 23-25,000 attendees, and between the events, constituencies, protests, networking, and the literature and other material passed out, it proved difficult to find anchors at this five-day gathering.  Despite this, there were particular ideas …

Web Roundups

Web Roundup: Dr. Jim Yong Kim at the World Bank, and, Dr. Robert Spitzer’s revocation

In the spirit of the web round-up series, this post gathers links to news stories and timely events of interest to the Somatosphere community that have appeared lately in the popular press and in medical anthropology circles. This month, the spotlight falls on two conversations, which will be treated separately: (1) the on-going conversation about ethics and humanitarianism, highlighted by …

Books

Book Review Essay: Nguyen’s The Republic of Therapy

This article is part of the series:

The Republic of Therapy: Triage and Sovereignty in West Africa’s Time of AIDS.

By Vinh-Kim Nguyen.

Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2010.

Pp. 256. ISBN 9780822348740. (Paperback, US $ 22.95)

Reviewed by Betsey Brada (Princeton University)

In The Republic of Therapy, Vinh-Kim Nguyen traces responses to the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Francophone West Africa between 1994, when effective …

Features

Humanity: a new journal

Humanity is a new periodical published by the University of Pennsylvania Press, which describes itself as an “international journal of human rights, humanitarianism and development.”  These topics have been a central interest for many anthropologists of late and indeed anthropology is well represented among the members of the editorial collective and contributors to the journal’s first issue.  Here’s how …