Books

Peter Redfield’s Life in Crisis

Life in crisis: The ethical journey of doctors without borders

by Peter Redfield

University of California Press, 2013. 338 pages.

 

“Should we only get involved in beautiful, sexy emergencies or also in hopeless places? Our work is to keep trying amid pessimism” (p. 241). These are the words of a Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) doctor alluding to what Peter …

Books

Top of the heap: Martyn Pickersgill

This article is part of the series:

This week Martyn Pickersgill of the University of Edinburgh speaks to “Top of the heap” about some recent books on humanitarianism, pharmaceuticals, dementia and expertise.

Martyn Pickersgill

Amongst other bits and pieces, I currently have two large projects on the go: one, on access to therapy in mental health, and the other, on neuroscience and family life. With regards to …

Features

Human

One almost feels sorry for the human these days.  After a heady flight toward near divinity, the figure has tumbled, Icarus-like, down from the intellectual firmament to a posthuman sea of forms, forces and flows large and small.  Even anthropology (the very citadel of anthropos!) is now awash with multispecies mashups, circulating microbes and wandering genes, not to mention zombie …

Books

Top of the heap: Paul Rabinow and Joshua Craze

This article is part of the series:

In this installment of “Top of the heap”, Berkeley anthropology professor Paul Rabinow and his student Joshua Craze share titles that span music, humanitarianism, witnessing, and photography.

Paul Rabinow

Peter Brown: Through the Eye of the Needle (Princeton, 2012) 

An extraordinarily important book, Through the Eye of the Needle, is a kind of summa of historian Peter Brown’s life …

Features

The biopolitics of maternal mortality: Anthropological observations from the Women Deliver Conference in Kuala Lumpur

Historically, attempts to alter the conditions and cultures of maternity and motherhood have been part of the civilizing projects of colonialism and the modernizing agendas of international development.  The goals have varied over time and space — from the prevention of maternal and infant deaths amidst fears of a depleted labour pool, to the prevention of “excessive fertility” amidst fears …