Web Roundups

Web Roundup: Ebola Update

This article is part of the series:

A great deal has happened since the first Web Roundup on Ebola. The epidemic has spread both in West Africa and globally, and material about Ebola has spread throughout the web. According to the CDC, as of October 22, a total of 9911 cases of Ebola have been reported, primarily in Liberia, Guinea, and Sierra Leone (map

Features

Against Sick States: Ebola Protests in Austerity Spain

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A few months ago, the independent Spanish online newspaper El Diario published a cartoon entitled “Ebola in Madrid”. It showed a health worker, camouflaged in a green protection suit, wearing a white head shield and goggles, leaning over a patient almost completely hidden under the sheets of the hospital bed. The huge hospital room is deserted and empty, …

Features

Persistent pathogen: A conference report of anthropological research on tuberculosis

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The 2013 World TB Day theme was “Stop TB in my lifetime,” calling attention to both the goal of virtually eliminating tuberculosis (TB) by 2050, as well as the Stop TB Partnership, established in 2000, through which global antituberculosis activities are coordinated. Despite this valiant slogan, tuberculosis control is at an important crossroads. In 2012, there were an estimated …

Features

Ebola and emergency anthropology: The view from the “global health slot”

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Hoses spraying disinfectant, white spacesuits, and police roadblocks: these are the tangible technologies of expertise in West Africa. Amid images of ongoing efforts to contain Ebola, I find myself asking: What is the role of the medical anthropologist in a global health emergency? What expertise can we contribute? As of 1 October 2014, the World Health Organization (WHO) counts 7178 …

Features

Ten Things that Anthropologists Can Do to Fight the West African Ebola Epidemic

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Like other anthropologists who have woken up mid-career and found the countries where they’ve lived and worked awash in mass deaths (and let’s be real… that’s quite a lot of us), my initial response to the Ebola outbreak in West Africa was to hope that the experts had the situation under control, and bury my head in the sand.

Soon, …

Features

Race and the immuno-logics of Ebola response in West Africa

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On September 14, 2014, I woke up to the news that a fourth Sierra Leonean doctor, Dr. Olivet Buck, had died after having treated patients with Ebola. By then, there had been nearly 2,300 confirmed deaths, with about 150 of them being health care workers at the front line of the epidemic. All Ebola deaths are tragic, and many of …