Features

Diagnosis where? Testing Pigs and Humans for T. solium cysticercosis in Uganda

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Two live pigs being transported to a local butcher in Mukono district, Uganda

Taenia solium is a zoonotic disease shared between humans and pigs. Humans become infected with T. solium, also known as the pork tapeworm, when they consume undercooked pork infected with porcine cysticercosis. Human cysticercosis develops when humans ingest T. solium eggs. If cysterici travel to the human …

Features

Humanitarian diagnostics for sleeping sickness in Uganda

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Map of sleeping sickness RDT availability (red dots) in the north-western region of Uganda hosting refugees from South Sudan. In 2015, the majority of refugees in this region lived in Adjumani district, where RDTs were selectively withdrawn (blue dots) because the government’s surveillance strategy was not identifying cases. Partly this was because of the social complexity of getting the RDTs

Books

Andrew Lakoff’s Unprepared: Global Health in a Time of Emergency

Unprepared: Global Health in a Time of Emergency

Andrew Lakoff

University of California Press, 2017. 240 pages.

 

Let us be frank: it is hard to think preparedness in the medical humanities without thinking of Andrew Lakoff. Over the ten years since the publication of his first piece on the subject (2007), Lakoff has developed, expanded and refined the critical …

Features

ReEBOV: Developing an Ebola rapid diagnostic test at research ground zero

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Expired ReEBOV tests in a hospital laboratory in Sierra Leone. Photograph by Ann Kelly

In June 2015, as Sierra Leone and Guinea was experiencing new surges in clusters of Ebola virus cases, Nature published a news article asking why an inexpensive test that “could save lives” was not being deployed to the field. Indeed, while it seemed obvious to many …

Web Roundups

Web Roundup: Something Rotten – Scent, Morality, Good and Evil

A well-known quote from Hamlet is “Something is rotten in the state of Denmark.” This, of course, refers to the illegitimate and immoral reign of the fictional King Claudius, Hamlet’s uncle. So, while there is plenty of current relevance related to the political and social turmoil hinted at by this line, instead let’s talk about another aspect that I find …

Features

After the End of Disease: Rethinking the Epidemic Narrative

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In conversations with people living with polio in Hungary, I often encountered members of the tight-knit community referring to themselves as “dinosaurs”. We are a breed that is about to die out, they said. Nobody gets polio anymore, some added, and they were right – epidemics, even sporadic wild polio cases disappeared from the country in the 1960s. Their words …