Features

Bird Flu: The Circulation of Life and Death in a Postspecies World

At the end of 2009, linguists around the world collected words to characterize the first decade of the new millennium.  “Aporkalypse” appeared at the top of their list, describing a swine-inspired end of days ushered in by the threat of bird flu. Though playful, this term points to a growing recognition that animals –and their diseases –have determining …

Web Roundups

Web Round Up

An estimated 400,000 women around the world are living with breast implants manufactured by the now defunct company Poly Implant Prosthese (PIP) using industrial grade silicone not approved for medical use. The scandal has raised concerns about the regulation of medical devices in Europe and provoked debate about neoliberal approaches to the body. Anthropologyworks points out that establishing who is …

Features

Epidemiology, the “Data Deluge,” and the Problem of “Good” Information

This article is part of the series:

Walking down the halls of a public health agency in the fall of 2009, I quickly became recognizable as the person doing research on information-sharing and sensemaking during infectious disease outbreaks. Two weeks into my tenure, I started being hailed by my academic association and playfully taunted with echoes of my research question: “Hey, Berkeley! Have you figured out the …

In the Journals

"Epidemics": a special issue of Behemoth

The electronic journal Behemoth which “focuses on the general problem of the fading and/or failing state,” has a new themed issue which focuses on epidemics, more specifically exploring “critical issues arising within the new problem space of emerging infectious diseases,” (Caduff 2010).  As Carlo Caduff argues in his introduction to the volume,

“In the aftermath of the Cold

In the Journals

“Multispecies Ethnography": a special issue of Cultural Anthropology

Just when you thought it was safe to engage in human exceptionalism…. Cultural Anthropology comes along with a special issue on “Multispecies Ethnography.

In their introduction– which surveys a range of literatures and conceptual turns which have preceded and laid the groundwork for this “species turn” – S. Eben Kirksey and Stefan Helmreich write:

“A new genre

Features

Anthropologists on H1N1 flu

Just as speculation is increasing about the possible scale of an H1N1 epidemic this fall, the latest issue of Medical Anthropology: Cross-Cultural Studies in Health and Illness includes three excellent editorials by anthropologists on the issue.

In “Biocommunicability and the Biopolitics of Pandemic Threats,” Charles Briggs and Mark Nichter focus on the communicative practices which made the epidemic …