Lectures

Handling Contested Truths in Times of Crises: Ghana’s COVID-19 Experience

This article is part of the series:

As the pandemic ravages the rest of the world, the casualty rate in Africa remains a mystery to those who predicted doom for the continent. Given African countries’ past experiences with infectious diseases, public health officials at the United Nations, aid agencies, media, and some experts predicted that the continent would be the most vulnerable and susceptible …

Lectures

The Invention of Infodemics: On the Outbreak of Zika and Rumors

This article is part of the series:

For Portuguese click here.

For French click here.

In December 2015, a Brazilian photographer with The Associated Press took a photo of four-month-old José Wesley being bathed in a bucket by his mother. The image was chosen by the photojournalist with care, to show the child himself, and also microcephaly, the best-known characteristic of what would come to …

Web Roundups

Web Roundup October 2012

Today I am testing the waters of the web roundups here at Somatosphere. Feel free to give feedback!

This month’s theme is data, inspired by many tweets I received on ENCODE and big data.

I was intrigued to hear that the American Anthropological Association has started an anthropological data wiki. The collection of datasets already seems pretty impressive, but …

Features

Epidemiology, the “Data Deluge,” and the Problem of “Good” Information

This article is part of the series:

Walking down the halls of a public health agency in the fall of 2009, I quickly became recognizable as the person doing research on information-sharing and sensemaking during infectious disease outbreaks. Two weeks into my tenure, I started being hailed by my academic association and playfully taunted with echoes of my research question: “Hey, Berkeley! Have you figured out the …