Lectures

Heat and Covid-19 in the Off-Grid City

This article is part of the series:

Amidst almost unstoppable contagion, many have hung their hopes on heat and humidity as a potential defence against contracting Covid-19. In the early months of the pandemic studies of SARS-CoV-2 suggested that the virus is transmitted less efficiently in higher temperatures or at higher rates of humidity, leading to encouraging newspaper headlines around the world, from London to Jakarta. …

Lectures

Africa, Laboratory Equipment and COVID-19 Response

This article is part of the series:

As the world struggles to address the COVID-19 crisis, attention increasingly turns to laboratories and the crucial role that they play in diagnostics and research. A rising number of reports from multiple countries detail these problems: lack of laboratories, reagents, technicians, and equipment form bottlenecks in both diagnosis and the race for a viable vaccine.

As COVID-19 cases start to …

Lectures

Futures and the past in Ghana’s Universal Health Coverage infrastructure

Promotional materials from the global campaign to achieve Universal Health Coverage by the year 2030. Copyright UHC2030 – reproduced here under ‘fair use’ for academic purposes.

“Health for All?” critically explores global moves towards Universal Health Coverage and its language of rights to health, equity, social justice and the public good. Highlighting emerging ethnographic and historical research by both young

Features

Ebola Afterlives

This article is part of the series:
Image by Eva Vernooij

Adiatu[1], a young Sierra Leonean laboratory scientist, turns on the light in the high risk room of the molecular unit of the recently renovated laboratory in Sierra Leone’s largest governmental hospital. The sterile, all-white laboratory space is filled with high-end equipment for the detection of Ebola virus. The biosafety cabinets, -80°C freezers, hotplates and …

Books

Omar Dewachi’s Ungovernable Life: Mandatory Medicine and Statecraft in Iraq

Ungovernable Life: Mandatory Medicine and Statecraft in Iraq

Omar Dewachi

Stanford University Press, 2017. 239 pp.

 

Every year, tens of thousands of Iraqi patients leave their country seeking healthcare, and Iraqi physicians move abroad seeking asylum and work. Omar Dewachi writes elsewhere about this crisis and the “therapeutic geographies”* it sets in motion, but in his book Ungovernable

Features

The Testing Revolution: Investigating Diagnostic Devices in Global Health

This article is part of the series:

The origins of laboratory medicine are often traced to the establishment of a small clinical laboratory in Guy’s Hospital, London, in 1828. Here, in a small side-room, medical students used sterilisers, incubators and microscopes to identify bacteriological organisms in biological samples taken from the patients in the ward next door. In this simple removal of bodily fluid from the patient’s …