Lectures

Virginia’s story: How the COVID-19 crisis can help us think about older adults who live in perennial abandonment

This article is part of the series:

V: Oh sweetie, don’t leave me. 

Magdalena: I have to go home now. But on Monday, I can bring you the Coca-Cola you asked me for. 

V: I’m not interested in the soda. You’re what’s interesting, someone to talk to. I don’t want to be left alone. Give me your hand; don’t go just yet. 

They had told me about …

Lectures

“The Measles from the Time of My Grandfather”: Amazonian Ethnocide Memories in Times of Covid-19

This article is part of the series:
“Kanari Kuikuro shows me a pot full of winged leafcutter ants he has just collected”. November, 2002. Xingu Indigenous Land, Brazil. Photo by Carlos Fausto

Two weeks ago, Kanari Kuikuro called me from Canarana, a small town in the Brazilian Amazon, where he now lives with his wife and many children. He is originally from the Xingu Indigenous Land, which lies …

Lectures

Governing COVID in Brazil: Dissecting the Ableist and Reluctant Authoritarian

This article is part of the series:

Brazilians, says President Jair Bolsonaro, are so tough they can fend off this pesky COVID-19 virus, the same virus that has killed more than 147,000+ people worldwide and counting. 

Likening COVID-19 to a “little flu”, the Brazilian leader has exposed, once again, how he governs this South American country with a toxic mix of populist mistrust of science, ableism, and …

Lectures

Populist Pharmakons

This article is part of the series:

On March 22, Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro delivered a long cadena– an impromptu speech carried live by public and regime-controlled TV stations – dedicated exclusively to COVID-19. Wearing, somewhat incongruously, a FC Barcelona tracksuit, Maduro gave a grim report on the spread of the virus around the world and justified his decision to impose a “voluntary and radical national …

BooksFeatures

Book Forum: Daniel Renfrew’s Life Without Lead: Contamination, Crisis, and Hope in Uruguay

Introduction

Daniel Renfrew’s Life Without Lead: Contamination, Crisis, and Hope in Uruguay (2018) is a masterful undertaking on the anthropology of disaster and its everydayness. An ethnographic portrayal that is prismatic in its attention, the book combines numerous elements––place, civic performance, history, political economy––to bear on the lead poisoning epidemic in Montevideo, Uruguay at the turn of the 21st

Lectures

Bioethnography and the Birth Cohort: A Method for Making New Kinds of Anthropological Knowledge about Transmission (which is what anthropology has been about all along)

© Elizabeth F. S. Roberts

These are pots and dishes. They transmit food and love. They transmit lead. They transmit class. They transmit enduring inequality and new forms of environmental degradation. These transmissions are conveyed through food, love, and chemical leaching. These pots are for sale in working class neighborhoods in Mexico City. They are passed around in families. They …