Features

Book Forum – Hervé Guibert’s Cytomegalovirus: A Hospitalization Diary

This article is part of the series:
436-cancelliere-2700x1800

A quarter-century after it was written, Hervé Guibert’s Cytomegalovirus reads both as a vital document of a particular moment in the history of the HIV/AIDS epidemic and as a wonderfully spare account of the banal humiliations and little triumphs of hospitalization in the shadow of a then-terminal illness.  Republished with a luminous Introduction by David Caron and a wide-ranging and

BooksFeatures

Book Forum––Sabine Arnaud’s On Hysteria

This article is part of the series:

9780226275543

 

Sabine Arnaud’s On Hysteria: The Invention of a Medical Category Between 1670 and 1820 focuses on the socio-medical category before its better-known (and more heavily studied) late nineteenth century instantiations, not to trace the prehistory of hysteria from the seventeenth to early nineteenth centuries, but in order to demonstrate how hysteria takes unexpected form during these earlier epochs. The …

BooksFeatures

Top of the heap: Angela Garcia

This article is part of the series:

For the first “Top of the Heap” of the new year, we spoke to Angela Garcia, Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Stanford University.  Here is her list:

Angela Garcia

Georges Bataille, Literature and Evil (M Boyars, 1973 [1957]).

My daughters are suddenly passionate about vampires. They read books and watch movies about vampires. They delight at the

Features

EEG

January, 2525. Below ground. Chemical fumes and white walls. A barely functional weblink with the following webpage, read to the sound of steady beeping:

The science of reading the electrical activity in the cerebral cortex is called encephalography; the material representation of the different electrical folds of the brain an encephalogram.

A biosignal like no other, the EEG is used

Features

Longing for Sleep: Assessing the Place of Sleep in the 21st Century – Part 3

This article is part of the series:

Sleep has been in the news for the past decade or so as a matter of growing concern. Along with this popular, medical and scientific attention, social scientists have been increasingly interested in sleep as an object or process of study. The first major sociological book published on sleep was Simon Williams’ Sleep and Society (Routledge, 2005), after which