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Book Forum — Nayanika Mookherjee’s The Spectral Wound: Sexual Violence, Public Memories, and the Bangladesh War of 1971

This article is part of the series:

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Andrew Brandel has organized an extraordinary and diverse set of commentaries on Nayanika Mookherjee’s The Spectral Wound: Sexual Violence, Public Memories, and the Bangladesh War of 1971 (Duke University Press, 2015). Each intervention is a path that moves outward from Mookherjee’s remarkable study, finding ways through the brambles of memory and history. We hope you enjoy. — Todd Meyers, …

Features

Creative Collaborations: The Making of “Lissa (Still Time):  a graphic medical ethnography of friendship, loss, and revolution”

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Is there a widely accessible yet conceptually rigorous way to convey anthropological insights into the lived complexities and bioethical dilemmas that attend managing chronic illness in two vastly different contexts: the contemporary Arab world and the United States? As it turns out, there is: comics. At the time we began to explore this question, we had both been excited by …

Books

Alexander Etkind’s Warped Mourning

Warped Mourning: Stories of the Undead in the Land of the Unburied

by Alexander Etkind

Stanford University Press, 2013; 328 pages.

 

Scholars of social and cultural memory in the post-Soviet space are well aware of the Memory at War project—the international collaborative effort to understand battles over memory as they were waged in postsocialist Poland, Russia, and Ukraine. …

Features

A Home for Science: the Anthropology of Tropical and Arctic Field-Stations

While the AAAs were winding up in Chicago, participants in the workshop, A Home for Science: the Anthropology of Tropical and Arctic Field-Stations, started to make their way north to an even colder part of the world. Hosted by the Department of Social Anthropology, University of Oslo, co-organized by Wenzel Geissler, John Manton, Ann Kelly and Gro

Features

Religion, Secularism, and Science at the Spanish Exhumation

“Every kind of religion produces its own kind of secularism,” (Harding 2014).[1]

 

“There were two classes of citizens: those that had won the war, and those who had lost. It was like in India—do you know of the caste system? It was the same here,” explained Cecilia[2] at an exhumation of mass graves from the Spanish Civil …

Web Roundups

Web Roundup: Our automated lives

As I’m studying in South India at the moment, it was impossible not to notice the hubbub around the Chess World Championship, which concluded last week in Chennai. I followed it closely, avidly reading the extensive coverage in the Indian press, and watching as many of the matches as I could live on YouTube. However, assuming very few of you …