Lectures

The subjects of digital psychiatry

This article is part of the series:
Giorgia Lupi/Stefanie Posavec (2014), MOMA
“Dear Data, Week 8, A Week of Phone Addiction”

All authors contributed equally to this essay

Imagine a room full of research assistants at a North American university listening to the audio recorded speech of human research subjects diagnosed with bipolar disorder. Though they will never meet or interact with these individuals, the research assistants …

Lectures

The Two Singapores: Spectacle and Twin Realities

This article is part of the series:

Early on in the global fight against COVID-19, Singapore’s response to the pandemic, centered around aggressive contact tracing and quarantining close contacts, was the subject of praise and admiration among the global community. However, much of this international sentiment had died out by April, as Singapore saw steeply rising infection rates in migrant worker dormitories around the country. Today, low-wage

Lectures

‘Stolen Spring’: Danish elders in plejehjemem under COVID-19 visiting restrictions

This article is part of the series:

First published in 1940, Hans Scherfig’s The Stolen Spring (Det Forsømte Forår) is both a satirical crime novel and a wry social commentary. Through his description of a school’s sociocultural dynamics and how administrators handle the murder of a teacher, Scherfig pointedly criticises particular patterns and structures in Danish society. As one reviewer wrote: “The small, scared …

Announcements

Tracking Digital Psy: Mental Health and Technology in an Age of Disruption

This article is part of the series:
Laurie Frick, “Mood + Quantify” (2011-13), Lasercut paper, wood, blocks, laminate.

Covid-19 and the associated social distancing orders have normalized and accelerated the use of digital technologies in psychiatry and mental health care. With the face-to-face therapeutic encounter newly fraught with infectious risks, digital interfaces have emerged as a connective tissue in a time of radical rupture and …

Lectures

The structural silencing of disabled children and their parents: A reflection on who is absent in discussions about the toll of coronavirus

This article is part of the series:

Content warning: suicidal ideation

Last Wednesday was the day I learned to always carry a paperclip in my pocket. 

We were laying in the soft green grass watching puffy clouds in the sky when my eight-year-old son threatened to jump from my bedroom window. He described how breaking glass would slice his neck and then kill him when he landed, …

Features

Genetics, neuroscience and the narrative on eating disorders: Where science and storytelling meet

The narrative around eating disorders is shifting. Researchers and activists have advanced a more complex understanding of eating disorders by presenting cutting-edge scientific and clinical research (increasingly incorporating insights from genetics and neuroscience) insisting on the importance of listening to and representing the experiences of marginalized groups. The concept of complexity, which can be defined as the state of having …