Features

After the End of Disease: Rethinking the Epidemic Narrative

This article is part of the series:

In conversations with people living with polio in Hungary, I often encountered members of the tight-knit community referring to themselves as “dinosaurs”. We are a breed that is about to die out, they said. Nobody gets polio anymore, some added, and they were right – epidemics, even sporadic wild polio cases disappeared from the country in the 1960s. Their words …

Features

Knowledge of living

It is time we anthropologists of biomedicine broaden our analytical scope. If it is the case that there is more to life than DNA, cells, tissues and organs; that there is more to disease than mutations, dysregulations and dysfunctions, then how is it that social studies of medicine have attained such a bio bent in recent decades? Of course, medicine …

Books

Miguel Kottow’s El Pa[de]ciente

This article is part of the series:

El Pa[de]cienteEl Pa[de]ciente: La medicina cuestionada. Un testimonio.

[The Suffering Patient: Medicine questioned. A testimony.]

by Miguel Kottow

Ocho libros. 2013, Reprinted 2014. 171 pages.

 

Note: The original version of this review was written in Spanish by Sebastián Medina Gay and published in the Chilean Journal of Public Health (Rev. Chilena de Salud Pública 2014; 18(2):227-229). It has been translated

Features

“Health Humanities: Building the Future of Research and Teaching” – a Conference Report

On April 4-5, 2014, the Obermann Center for Advanced Studies at the University of Iowa hosted a working symposium intended to assess, analyze, and generate action in the field of health humanities. The two-day event was an overwhelming success, exceeding the expectations of presenters and participants alike as an illuminating, productive, and inspiring conference.

Day one began with welcome addresses …

Books

Becoming a moral doctor

Medical Ethics Education: An Interdisciplinary and Social Theoretical Perspective

by Nathan Emmerich

Springer, 2013. 111 pp.

 

“The most common criticism made at present by older practitioners is that young graduates have been taught a great deal about the mechanism of disease, but very little about the practice of medicine—or, to put it more bluntly, they are too “scientific” and

Teaching ResourcesWeb Roundups

An archive of illness narratives

The BMJ’s Medical Humanities blog recently reviewed Dipex.org – a site which archives illness narratives of people with a variety of different conditions, ranging from various cancers to depression to neurological disorders. The site was developed by an Oxford-based team, which includes two medical sociologists, and is primarily meant to give patients suffering from various illnesses a place to find …