Books

Melinda Cooper’s Family Values: Between Neoliberalism and the New Social Conservatism

Family Values: Between Neoliberalism and the New Social Conservatism

Melinda Cooper

MIT Press, 2017, 416 pages.

 

Neoliberal policy in the United States sometimes seems internally contradictory.  Why oppose the estate tax if you support a meritocracy based on how the market values individuals?  Why oppose universal health coverage or public education if you want everyone to have an equal …

Books

Michele Friedner’s “Valuing Deaf Worlds in Urban India”

Friedner cover imageValuing Deaf Worlds in Urban India

by Michele Friedner

Rutgers University Press, 2015, 216 pages

 

An Indian coffee shop franchise advertises their practice of hiring deaf baristas – “silent brewmasters” – to work their espresso machines. A Bangalore tech company boasts that it hires “physically challenged” workers only (118-121). Meanwhile, deaf adults in Bangalore complain that adult education at …

Books

William Connolly’s The Fragility of Things

978-0-8223-5584-7_prThe Fragility of Things: Self-organizing Processes, Neoliberal Fantasies, and Democratic Activism

by William E. Connolly

Duke University Press, 2013, 256 pages.

 

In The Fragility of Things: Self-organizing Processes, Neoliberal Fantasies, and Democratic Activism (2013), political theorist William Connolly delivers us into a chaotic world: “a world of becoming in which multiple force fields set on different tiers of chronotime …

Books

Jonathan Xavier Inda’s Racial Prescriptions

PPCspine22mmRacial Prescriptions: Pharmaceuticals, Difference, and the Politics of Life

by Jonathan Xavier Inda

Ashgate, 2014, 148 pages.

 

Racial Prescriptions provides an eloquent and theoretically-engaged account of the story of BiDil, a pharmaceutical that has become an iconic case for scholars of race in science and medicine. When BiDil was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in …

Features

Ebola 2014. Chronicle of a well-prepared disaster

This article is part of the series:

A French version of this piece was originally published in Libération on 18 September 2014.

“It is useless to laboriously interpret disaster movies in terms of their relation to an ‘objective’ social crisis or even to an ‘objective’ phantasm of disaster,” wrote Jean Baudrillard in 1981. “It is in another sense that (…) it is the social itself that, in …