Books

Jenell Johnson’s American Lobotomy: A Rhetorical History

americanlobotomycoverAmerican Lobotomy: A Rhetorical History

by Jenell Johnson

University of Michigan Press, 2014, 240 pages.

 

Jenell Johnson’s 2014 book American Lobotomy: A Rhetorical History provides an accessible and thoroughly enjoyable look at how an infamous medical procedure – the lobotomy – developed, was administered, initially applauded, ultimately loathed, and has had an enduring and profound impact upon medicalization of …

Features

Experimental anthropology in the making: a conversation with Andreas Roepstorff

Andreas Roepstorff is Professor in Anthropology at Aarhus University in Denmark, where he is also Director of the Interacting Minds Centre. Since the early 2000s, he has pursued an intensely interdisciplinary and collaborative research-programme at the intersections of anthropology, science and technology studies, and cognitive neuroscience – while also using his ethnographic training to reflect back on this his own

Books

Brigitte Chamak and Baptiste Moutaud’s Neurosciences et Société

This article is part of the series:

Chamak - CoverNeurosciences et société: Enjeux des savoirs et des pratiques sur le cerveau

Brigitte Chamak and Baptiste Moutaud, eds.

2014, Armand Colin, 322 pages

 

Neurosciences et société is a valuable addition to the diversified universe of studies concerning neurosciences in society. Indeed, the last few years have seen the publication of a number of important articles, single-authored books, and …

Books

Daniel P. Todes’ Ivan Pavlov: A Russian Life in Science

9780199925193Ivan Pavlov: A Russian Life in Science

by Daniel P. Todes

Oxford University Press, 2014. 880 pages.

 

It is going to be difficult for reviewers to avoid clichés about this wonderful biography – and wonderful it is, as both a work of scholarship and as a highly readable story of a truly ‘Russian life in science’. Some basic things …

Features

Confusion, Truth, and Bureaucracy: A reply to Fitzgerald and Callard

Des Fitzgerald and Felicity Callard have recently offered some advice, a normative orientation even, for those engaging in collaboration:

“Living well in a collaborative mode is about resisting the urge to sort things out – it is about quelling the desire to be clear, at all times, on who ‘I’ am, and what ‘I’ am doing, and whether or

Features

Entangled in the collaborative turn: observations from the field

If there really has been a ‘collaborative turn’ between the social and biological sciences, then the stakes of that turn are still very much to be negotiated. ‘Collaboration,’ of course, is not a practice or a structure simply to be aimed for: like all ethical and methodological commitments, collaboration is made in the turning – and thus the actual forms …