Features

The Two Singapores: On The Ground (from Home)

This article is part of the series:

“The Two Singapores” is an ongoing interview miniseries run by Somatosphere to interrogate Singapore’s COVID-19 response, in particular in its handling of the explosion of cases among migrant workers living in cramped dormitories. The series aims to shed a light on Singapore’s reliance on cheap migrant labor in maintaining its image as a glitzy, cosmopolitan city-state, and aims to offer

Lectures

The Two Singapores: Spectacle and Twin Realities

This article is part of the series:

Early on in the global fight against COVID-19, Singapore’s response to the pandemic, centered around aggressive contact tracing and quarantining close contacts, was the subject of praise and admiration among the global community. However, much of this international sentiment had died out by April, as Singapore saw steeply rising infection rates in migrant worker dormitories around the country. Today, low-wage

Lectures

Wrong, but Useful – for Whom? The Politics of Pandemic Modeling

This article is part of the series:

On March 17th, after a tepid initial COVID-19 response, Prime Minister Boris Johnson began encouraging citizens to avoid non-essential social contact. President Donald Trump followed suit, introducing travel bans and social distancing policies. These responses marked the beginnings of drastic and unprecedented government measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in the United States and the United Kingdom.

A major …

Books

Melinda Cooper’s Family Values: Between Neoliberalism and the New Social Conservatism

Family Values: Between Neoliberalism and the New Social Conservatism

Melinda Cooper

MIT Press, 2017, 416 pages.

 

Neoliberal policy in the United States sometimes seems internally contradictory.  Why oppose the estate tax if you support a meritocracy based on how the market values individuals?  Why oppose universal health coverage or public education if you want everyone to have an equal …

Features

Stakes of Life: Science, states, policies, publics and ‘the first thousand days’

This article is part of the series:

Welcome back to the “First Thousand Days of LifeSomatosphere series. Here we continue to explore the ways that a global health initiative driven by new findings in epigenetics and neuroscience and by a reframing of theories about health and disease in terms of developmental origins shape ideas about (global) health and population futures, invigorate campaigns, and take …

Features

How the Face Became an Organ

On July 3 of this year, the face became an “organ”. Changes to US Federal health policy came into effect, moving face transplantation into the jurisdiction of medical procedures governed and administrated by the agencies that oversee the US national transplant system – the Organ Procurement and Transplant Network (OPTN) and the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS). This policy …